Form I-130/I-130A Instructions

Petition for Alien Relative and Spouse Beneficiary Information Instructions

Instructions for Form I-130, Petition for Alien Relative, and Form I-130A, Supplemental Information for Spouse Beneficiary

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Instructions for Form I-130, Petition for Alien Relative,
and Form I-130A, Supplemental Information for
Spouse Beneficiary
Department of Homeland Security
U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services

USCIS
Form I-130/I-130A
OMB No. 1615-0012
Expires 02/28/2021

What Is the Purpose of Form I-130?
A citizen or lawful permanent resident of the United States may file Form I-130, Petition for Alien Relative, with U.S.
Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) to establish the existence of a relationship to certain alien relatives who
wish to immigrate to the United States.

Who May File Form I-130?
1.	 If you are a U.S. citizen, you must file a separate Form I-130 for each eligible relative. You may file Form I-130 for:
A.	 Your spouse;
B.	 Your unmarried children under 21 years of age;
C.	 Your unmarried sons or daughters 21 years of age or older;
D.	 Your married sons or daughters of any age;
E.	 Your brothers or sisters (you must be 21 years of age or older); and
F.	 Your mother or father (you must be 21 years of age or older).
2.	 If you are a lawful permanent resident of the United States, you must file a separate Form I-130 for each eligible
relative. You may file Form I-130 for:
A.	 Your spouse;
B.	 Your unmarried child under 21 years of age; and
C.	 Your unmarried son or daughter 21 years of age or older.
NOTE:
1.	 If you are filing for your spouse, he or she must complete and sign Form I-130A, Supplemental Information for
Spouse Beneficiary. If your spouse is overseas, Form I-130A must still be completed, but your spouse does not have
to sign Form I-130A. Form I-130A must be submitted with Form I-130.
2.	 There is no visa category for married children of lawful permanent residents. If you are a lawful permanent resident
and you filed Form I-130 for your unmarried son or daughter, but your son or daughter marries before immigrating to
the United States or adjusting status to lawful permanent resident, we will deny or automatically revoke your petition.
3.	 Non-citizen U.S. nationals (as defined in the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA) section 308) have the same rights
as lawful permanent residents to petition for family members. If you are a U.S. national born in American Samoa or
Swains Island (or who otherwise qualifies as a non-citizen U.S. national, as described in INA section 308), you should
indicate in Part 2., Item Number 36. of the petition that you are a lawful permanent resident. You do not need to list
an Alien Registration Number (A-Number) in Part 2., Item Number 1. of the petition.
4.	 If the beneficiary qualifies under Items 1.C., 1.D., or 1.E. above, you are not required to file separate petitions for the
beneficiary’s spouse or unmarried children under 21 years of age. They are considered derivative beneficiaries and
you should list them in Part 4. of this petition.
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5.	 If you are the lawful permanent resident petitioner and the beneficiary qualifies under Items 2.A., 2.B., or 2.C. above,
you are not required to file separate petitions for the beneficiary’s unmarried children under 21 years of age. They are
considered derivative beneficiaries and you should list them in Part 4. of this petition.
6.	 The derivative beneficiaries described in Items 4. and 5. above may apply for an immigrant visa along with the
beneficiary.

Who May Not File Form I-130?
You may NOT file Form I-130 for a person in the following categories:
1.	 An adoptive parent or adopted child, if the adoption took place after the child turned 16 years of age, or if the child
has not been in the legal custody and has not lived with the parents for at least 2 years before filing the petition;
2.	 A natural parent, if you gained lawful permanent resident status or U.S. citizenship through adoption or as a special
immigrant juvenile;
3.	 A stepparent or stepchild, if the marriage that created the relationship took place after the child turned 18 years of age;
4.	 A spouse, if you and your spouse were not both physically present at the marriage ceremony, unless the marriage was
consummated;
5.	 A spouse, if you gained lawful permanent resident status through a prior marriage to a U.S. citizen or lawful
permanent resident, unless:
A.	 You are now a naturalized U.S. citizen;
B.	 You have been a lawful permanent resident for at least five years;
C.	 You can establish by clear and convincing evidence that you did not enter the prior marriage (through which you
gained your lawful permanent resident status) in order to evade any U.S. immigration law; or
D.	 Your prior marriage through which you gained your immigrant status was terminated by the death of your former
spouse;
6.	 A spouse, if you married your spouse while he or she was the subject of an exclusion, deportation, removal, or
rescission proceeding regarding his or her right to be admitted into or to remain in the United States, or while a
decision in any of these proceedings was before any court on judicial review. However, you may be eligible for the
bona fide marriage exemption under INA section 245(e)(3) if:
A.	 You request in writing a bona fide marriage exemption and prove by clear and convincing evidence that the
marriage is legally valid where it took place and that you and your spouse married in good faith and not for the
purpose of obtaining lawful permanent resident status for your spouse and that no fee or any other consideration
(other than appropriate attorney fees) was given to you for your filing of this petition. The request must be
submitted with Form I-130; or
B.	 Your spouse has lived outside the United States, after the marriage, for a period of at least two years;
7.	 Any person, if USCIS determines that he or she entered into or attempted or conspired to enter into a marriage in
order to evade U.S. immigration laws; and
8.	 A grandparent, grandchild, nephew, niece, uncle, aunt, cousin, or parent-in-law.

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General Instructions
USCIS provides forms free of charge through the USCIS website. In order to view, print, or fill out our forms, you should
use the latest version of Adobe Reader, which can be downloaded for free at http://get.adobe.com/reader/. If you do not
have Internet access, you may call the USCIS National Customer Service Center at 1-800-375-5283 and ask that we mail
a form to you. For TTY (deaf or hard of hearing) call: 1-800-767-1833.
Signature. Each petition must be properly signed and filed. For all signatures on this petition, USCIS will not accept a
stamped or typewritten name in place of a signature. A legal guardian may also sign for a mentally incompetent person.
Filing Fee. Each petition must be accompanied by the appropriate filing fee. (See the What Is the Filing Fee section of
these Instructions.)
Biometric Services Fee. If you file this petition with USCIS, you do not need to include a biometric services fee at the
time you submit your petition. If you are later notified that you must submit biometrics, you will receive a biometric
services appointment notice with instructions on how to submit the additional biometric services fee. If you file this
petition with an agency other than USCIS, please check with that agency to determine if and when you must submit a
biometric services fee.
Evidence. At the time of filing, you must submit all evidence and supporting documentation listed in the General
Requirements section of these Instructions. USCIS may issue a Notice of Intent to Deny (NOID) or a Denial Notice for
petitions filed without the required supporting evidence.
Biometric Services Appointment. USCIS may require that you appear for an interview or provide fingerprints,
photograph, and/or signature at any time to verify your identity, obtain additional information, and conduct background
and security checks, including a check of criminal history records maintained by the Federal Bureau of Investigation
(FBI), before making a decision on your application, petition, or request. After USCIS receives your petition and ensures
it is complete, we will inform you in writing, if you need to attend a biometric services appointment. If an appointment is
necessary, the notice will provide you the location of your local or designated USCIS Application Support Center (ASC)
and the date and time of your appointment or, if you are currently overseas, instruct you to contact a U.S. Embassy, U.S.
Consulate, or USCIS office outside the United States to set up an appointment.
If you are required to provide biometrics, at your appointment you must sign an oath reaffirming that:
1.	 You provided or authorized all information in the petition;
2.	 You reviewed and understood all of the information contained in, and submitted with, your petition; and
3.	 All of this information was complete, true, and correct at the time of filing.
If you fail to attend your biometric services appointment, USCIS may deny your petition.
Copies. You may submit legible photocopies of documents requested, unless the Instructions specifically state that you
must submit an original document. USCIS may request an original document at the time of filing or at any time during
processing of an application, petition, or request. If you submit original documents when not required, the documents
may remain a part of the record, and USCIS will not automatically return them to you.
Translations. If you submit a document with information in a foreign language, you must also submit a full English
translation. The translator must sign a certification that the English language translation is complete and accurate, and that
he or she is competent to translate from the foreign language into English. The certification should also include the date,
the translator’s signature and printed name, and may contain the translator’s contact information.
How To Fill Out Form I-130
1.	 Type or print legibly in black ink.
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2.	 If you need extra space to complete any item within this petition, use the space provided in Part 9. Additional
Information or attach a separate sheet of paper; type or print your name and A-Number (if any) at the top of each
sheet; indicate the Page Number, Part Number, and Item Number to which your answer refers; and sign and date
each sheet.
3.	 Answer all questions fully and accurately. If a question does not apply to you (for example, if you have never been
married and the question asks, “Provide the name of your current spouse”), type or print “N/A,” unless otherwise
directed. If your answer to a question which requires a numeric response is zero or none (for example, “How many
children do you have” or “How many times have you departed the United States”), type or print “None,” unless
otherwise directed.
4.	 Enter dates in mm/dd/yyyy format. If you cannot provide an exact date, provide an approximate date in the same
format and include an explanation in Part 9. Additional Information.
5.	 USCIS Online Account Number (if any). If you have previously filed an application, petition, or request using the
USCIS online filing system (previously called USCIS Electronic Immigration System (USCIS ELIS)), provide the
USCIS Online Account Number you were issued by the system. You can find your USCIS Online Account Number
by logging in to your account and going to the profile page. If you previously filed certain applications, petitions,
or requests on a paper form via a USCIS Lockbox facility, you may have received a USCIS Online Account Access
Notice issuing you a USCIS Online Account Number. If you received such a notice, your USCIS Online Account
Number can be found at the top of the notice. If you were issued a USCIS Online Account Number, enter it in the
space provided at Part 2., Item Number 2. The USCIS Online Account Number is not the same as an A-Number.
6.	 Part 3. Biographic Information. Provide the biographic information requested in Part 3., Item Numbers 1. - 6.
Providing this information as part of your petition may reduce the time you spend at your USCIS ASC appointment as
described in the Biometric Services Appointment section of these Instructions.
A.	 Ethnicity and Race. Select the boxes that best describe your ethnicity and race.
Categories and Definitions for Ethnicity and Race
(1)	 Hispanic or Latino. A person of Cuban, Mexican, Puerto Rican, South or Central American, or other Spanish
culture or origin, regardless of race. (NOTE: This category is only included under Ethnicity in Part 3., Item
Number 1.)
(2)	 White. A person having origins in any of the original peoples of Europe, the Middle East, or North Africa.
(3)	 Asian. A person having origins in any of the original peoples of the Far East, Southeast Asia, or the Indian
subcontinent including, for example, Cambodia, China, India, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Pakistan, the Philippine
Islands, Thailand, and Vietnam.
(4)	 Black or African American. A person having origins in any of the black racial groups of Africa.
(5)	 American Indian or Alaska Native. A person having origins in any of the original peoples of North and
South America (including Central America), and who maintains tribal affiliation or community attachment.
(6)	 Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander. A person having origins in any of the original peoples of
Hawaii, Guam, Samoa, or other Pacific Islands.
B.	 Height. Select the values that best match your height in feet and inches. For example, if you are five feet and
nine inches, select “5” for feet and “09” for inches. Do not enter your height in meters or centimeters.
C.	 Weight. Enter your weight in pounds. If you do not know your weight, or need to enter a weight under 30
pounds or over 699 pounds, enter “000.” Do not enter your weight in kilograms.
D.	 Eye Color. Select the box that best describes the color of your eyes.
E.	 Hair Color. Select the box that best describes the color of your hair.

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7.	 Form I-94 Arrival-Departure Record. Complete Part 4., Item Numbers 46.b. - 50., of the petition regarding the
admission or travel document for the beneficiary.
If U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) or USCIS issued the beneficiary a Form I-94, Arrival-Departure Record,
provide the beneficiary’s Form I-94 number and date that his or her authorized period of stay expires or expired (as
shown on Form I-94). The Form I-94 number also is known as the Departure Number on some versions of Form I-94.
NOTE: If the beneficiary was admitted to the United States by CBP at an airport or seaport after April 30, 2013, he
or she may have been issued an electronic Form I-94 by CBP, instead of a paper Form I-94. The beneficiary may
visit the CBP website at www.cbp.gov/i94 to obtain a paper version of his or her electronic Form I-94. CBP does not
charge a fee for this service. Some travelers admitted to the United States at a land border, airport, or seaport, after
April 30, 2013 with a passport or travel document, who were issued a paper Form I-94 by CBP, may also be able to
obtain a replacement Form I-94 from the CBP website without charge. If his or her Form I-94 cannot be obtained
from the CBP website, it may be obtained by filing Form I-102, Application for Replacement/Initial Nonimmigrant
Arrival-Departure Record, with USCIS. USCIS does charge a fee for this service.
Passport and Travel Document Numbers. Complete Part 4., Item Numbers 45. - 50., as applicable, if the
beneficiary relative used a passport or travel document to travel to the United States, enter either the passport or travel
document information in the appropriate space on the petition, even if the passport or travel document is currently
expired.
8.	 Part 6. Petitioner’s Statement, Contact Information, Declaration, and Signature. Select the appropriate box to
indicate whether you read this petition yourself or whether you had an interpreter assist you. If someone assisted you
in completing the petition, select the box indicating that you used a preparer. Further, you must sign and date your
petition and provide your daytime telephone number, mobile telephone number (if any), and email address (if any).
Every petition MUST contain the signature of the petitioner (or parent or legal guardian, if applicable). A stamped or
typewritten name in place of a signature is not acceptable.
9.	 Part 7. Interpreter’s Contact Information, Certification, and Signature. If you used anyone as an interpreter to
read the Instructions and questions on this petition to you in a language in which you are fluent, the interpreter must
fill out this section, provide his or her name, the name and address of his or her business or organization (if any), his
or her daytime telephone number, his or her mobile telephone number (if any), and his or her email address (if any).
The interpreter must sign and date the petition.
10.	 Part 8. Contact Information, Declaration, and Signature of the Person Preparing this Petition, if Other Than
the Petitioner. This section must contain the signature of the person who completed your petition, if other than
you, the petitioner. If the same individual acted as your interpreter and your preparer, that person should complete
both Part 7. and Part 8. If the person who completed this petition is associated with a business or organization,
that person should complete the business or organization name and address information. Anyone who helped you
complete this petition MUST sign and date the petition. A stamped or typewritten name in place of a signature is
not acceptable. If the person who helped you prepare your petition is an attorney or accredited representative whose
representation extends beyond preparation of this petition, he or she may be obliged to also submit a completed Form
G-28, Notice of Entry of Appearance as Attorney or Accredited Representative, along with your petition.
We recommend that you print or save a copy of your completed petition to review in the future and for your
records. We recommend that you review your copy of your completed petition before you come to your
biometric services appointment at a USCIS ASC. At your appointment, USCIS will permit you to complete the
petition process only if you are able to confirm, under penalty of perjury, that all of the information in your petition
is complete, true, and correct. If you are not able to make that attestation in good faith at that time, USCIS will
require you to return for another appointment.

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General Requirements
1.	 Does approval of this petition mean that my family member is automatically a lawful permanent resident or
they can immediately immigrate to the United States?
No. An approved petition does not give the beneficiary automatic lawful permanent resident status or permission to
immediately immigrate to the United States.
2.	 When will a visa become available?
When a petition is approved for the spouse, unmarried children under 21 years of age, or parents of a U.S. citizen,
these persons are classified as immediate relatives, which means visas are immediately available to them.
When a petition is approved for a U.S. citizen’s sibling or married or adult son or daughter, or for a lawful permanent
resident’s spouse, child, or unmarried son or daughter, it is assigned to the appropriate visa preference category. Each
year, a limited number of immigrant visas are available for each preference category. The visas are processed in the
order in which the petitions are properly filed and accepted by us. To be considered properly filed, a petition must be
fully completed and signed, and the filing fee must be paid.
For a monthly report on the dates when immigrant visas are available, call the U.S. Department of State at
1-202-663-1541, or visit their website at www.travel.state.gov.
3.	 What documents do you need to show that you are a U.S. citizen?
A.	 A copy of your birth certificate, issued by a civil registrar, vital statistics office, or other civil authority showing
that you were born in the United States;
B.	 A copy of your naturalization certificate or certificate of citizenship issued by USCIS or the former Immigration
and Naturalization Service (INS);
C.	 A copy of Form FS-240, Consular Report of Birth Abroad (CRBA), issued by a U.S. Embassy or U.S. Consulate;
D.	 A copy of your unexpired U.S. passport; or
E.	 An original statement from a U.S. consular officer verifying that you are a U.S. citizen with a valid passport.
If you do not have any of the above documents and you were born in the United States, see the What if an official
document is not available section of these Instructions.
4.	 What documents do you need to show that you are a lawful permanent resident?
If you are a lawful permanent resident, you must file your petition with a copy of the front and back of your
Permanent Resident Card (Form I-551). If you have not yet received your card, submit copies of your passport
biographic page and the page showing admission as a lawful permanent resident, or other evidence of permanent
resident status issued by USCIS or the former INS.
5.	 What documents do you need to prove family relationship?
You have to prove that there is a family relationship between you and the beneficiary. If you are filing for a relative
listed below, submit the following documentation to prove the family relationship.
A.	 A spouse:
(1)	 A copy of your marriage certificate;
(2)	 If either you were or your spouse was previously married, submit copies of documents showing that each of
the prior marriages was legally terminated; and
(3)	 You must submit two identical color passport-style photographs of yourself and your spouse (if he or she is
in the United States) taken within 30 days of filing this petition. The photos must have a white to off-white
background, be printed on thin paper with a glossy finish, and be unmounted and unretouched.

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The two identical color passport-style photos must be 2 by 2 inches. The photos must be in color with full
face, frontal view on a white to off-white background. Head height should measure 1 to 1 3/8 inches from top
of hair to bottom of chin, and eye height is between 1 1/8 to 1 3/8 inches from bottom of photo. Your head
must be bare unless you are wearing headwear as required by a religious denomination of which you are a
member. Using a pencil or felt pen, lightly print your name and A-Number (if any) on the back of the photo.
NOTE: In addition to the required documentation listed above, you should submit one or more of the
following types of documentation that may prove you have a bona fide marriage:
(1)	 Documentation showing joint ownership of property;
(2)	 A lease showing joint tenancy of a common residence, meaning you both live at the same address together;
(3)	 Documentation showing that you and your spouse have combined your financial resources;
(4)	 Birth certificates of children born to you and your spouse together;
(5)	 Affidavits sworn to or affirmed by third parties having personal knowledge of the bona fides of the marital
relationship. Each affidavit must contain the full name and address of the person making the affidavit; date
and place of birth of the person making the affidavit; and complete information and details explaining how the
person acquired his or her knowledge of your marriage; or
(6)	 Any other relevant documentation to establish that there is an ongoing marital union.
NOTE: You must submit clear and convincing evidence that you and your spouse entered into the
marriage in good faith and not for immigration purposes if you married your spouse while your spouse
was the subject of an exclusion, deportation, removal, or rescission proceeding (including during the
judicial review of any one of these proceedings); or you are a lawful permanent resident that obtained
your permanent residence through a prior marriage that was not determined by the death of your
spouse and you are filing your petition for your spouse that you were married within five years of
obtaining your permanent residence.
B.	 A child and you are the mother: Submit a copy of the child’s birth certificate showing your name and the name
of your child.
C.	 A child and you are the father: Submit a copy of the child’s birth certificate showing both parents’ names, your
marriage certificate to the child’s mother, and proof of legal termination of the parents’ prior marriages, if any,
issued by civil authorities.
D.	 A child born out of wedlock and you are the father: Submit evidence that you and the mother were married
while the child was under 18 years of age, or submit evidence that the child was legitimated under the law of the
child’s residence or domicile, or under the law of your residence or domicile, before the child reached 18 years of
age. If your child was not legitimated before reaching 18 years of age, you must file your petition with copies of
evidence that a bona fide parent-child relationship existed between you and the child before the child reached 21
years of age. This may include evidence that you lived with the child, supported him or her, or otherwise showed
continuing parental interest in the child’s welfare.
E.	 A brother or sister: Submit a copy of your birth certificate and a copy of your brother’s or sister’s birth
certificate showing that you have at least one common parent. If you and your brother or sister have a common
father but different mothers, submit copies of the marriage certificates showing that your father was married to
each mother, as well as copies of documents showing that any prior marriages of either your father or mothers
were legally terminated. If you and your brother or sister are related through adoption or a stepparent, or if you
have a common father and either of you were not legitimated before you turned 18 years of age, see Items D., H.,
and I. in these Instructions for additional information on proving your family relationship.
F.	 A mother: Submit a copy of your birth certificate showing your name and your mother’s name.

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G.	 A father: Submit a copy of your birth certificate showing the names of both parents. Also submit a copy of your
parents’ marriage certificate establishing that your father was married to your mother. If either your mother or
father were previously married, submit copies of documents showing that each of the prior marriages was legally
terminated. If you are filing for a stepparent or adoptive parent, or if you are filing for your father and you were
born out of wedlock, see Items D., H., and I. in these Instructions for additional information on proving your
family relationship.
H.	 Stepparent/Stepchild: If your petition is based on a stepparent-stepchild relationship, you must file your petition
with a copy of the marriage certificate of the stepparent to the child’s natural parent showing that the marriage
occurred before the child turned 18 years of age, copies of documents showing that any prior marriages were
legally terminated (if applicable), and a copy of the stepchild’s birth certificate.
I.	 Adoptive parent or adopted child: If you and the person you are filing for are related by adoption, you must
submit a copy of the adoption decree showing that the adoption took place before the child turned 16 years of age.
If you adopted a child under 16 years of age, and you also adopted the older sibling of that child, you may file a
petition for the older child if the adoption occurred before the older child turned 18 years of age. You must submit
a copy of the adoption decree showing that the adoption of the sibling occurred before the sibling turned 18 years
of age.
In either case, you must also submit copies of evidence that each child was in the legal custody of and resided
with the parents who adopted him or her for at least two years before or after adoption. Only a court or
recognized government entity may grant legal custody, and it is usually granted at the time the adoption is
finalized. However, if legal custody is granted by a court or recognized government entity prior to the adoption,
that time may count toward fulfilling the 2-year legal custody requirement.
6.	 Notice to persons filing for spouses, if you have been married less than two years.
If you have been married less than two years on the date your spouse has obtained permanent resident status, USCIS
will grant your spouse conditional permanent resident status for two years under INA section 216. USCIS then
requires both you and your spouse to file Form I-751, Petition to Remove Conditions on Residence, during the 90-day
period immediately before your spouse’s conditional permanent resident status expires.
Conditional permanent residents have the same rights, privileges, responsibilities, and duties as all other lawful
permanent residents. A conditional permanent resident is not limited in his or her right to apply for naturalization, file
petitions on behalf of qualifying relatives, or reside permanently in the United States as an immigrant in accordance
with U.S. immigration laws.
NOTE: If your spouse fails to timely file Form I-751 to remove the conditional basis of his or her spouse’s
permanent resident status, USCIS will terminate his or her permanent resident status and begin removal proceedings.
7.	 What if a name has changed?
If either you or the person you are filing for is using a name that is not the same name shown on the relevant
documents, you must file your petition with copies of the legal documents reflecting the name change, such as a
marriage certificate, adoption decree, or court order.
8.	 What if an official document is not available?
In this situation, submit a statement from the appropriate civil authority certifying that the document or documents
are not available. You must also submit secondary evidence, which may include one or more of the following records
listed below.
A.	 Religious record: A copy of a document bearing the seal of the religious organization showing that the baptism,
dedication, or comparable rite occurred within two months after birth, and showing the date and place of the
child’s birth, date of the religious ceremony, and the names of the child’s parents.
B.	 School record: A letter from the authority (preferably the first school attended) showing the date of admission to
the school, the child’s date of birth or age at that time, place of birth, and names of the parents.
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C.	 Census record: State or Federal census records showing the names, place of birth, date of birth, or the age of the
person listed.
D.	 If records like those described above are not available, then you may submit two or more written statements from
individuals who were living at the time and who have personal knowledge of the event you are trying to prove,
such as the date and place of birth, marriage, or death. The individuals making the written statements do not
have to be U.S. citizens. Each written statement must contain the following information regarding the individual
making the written statement: his or her full name, address, date and place of birth, full information concerning
the event, and complete details explaining how the individual acquired personal knowledge of the event.
Finally, each individual’s written statement must include the following declaration, “I declare (or certify, verify,
or state) under penalty of perjury under the laws of the United States of America that the foregoing is true and
correct. Executed on [date], [signature].”
E.	 For parent-child relationships only: If other forms of evidence have proven inconclusive, the petitioner
may submit on a voluntary basis other evidence of a birth parent and birth child relationship to include
deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) testing. DNA test results will only be accepted by USCIS from parentage-testing
laboratories accredited by the American Association of Blood Banks (AABB). A list of laboratories can be
viewed at www.aabb.org/sa/facilities/Pages/RTestAccrFac.aspx.

What Is the Filing Fee?
The filing fee for Form I-130 is $535. The filing fee for this petition cannot be waived.
NOTE: The filing fee is not refundable, regardless of any action USCIS takes on this petition. DO NOT MAIL CASH.
You must submit all fees in the exact amounts.
Use the following guidelines when you prepare your check or money order for the Form I-130:
1.	 The check or money order must be drawn on a bank or other financial institution located in the United States and must
be payable in U.S. currency; and
2.	 Make the check or money order payable to U.S. Department of Homeland Security.
NOTE: Spell out U.S. Department of Homeland Security; do not use the initials “USDHS” or “DHS.”
3.	 If you live outside the United States, contact the nearest U.S. Embassy or U.S. Consulate for instructions on the
method of payment.
Notice to Those Making Payment by Check. If you send us a check, USCIS will convert it into an electronic funds
transfer (EFT). This means we will copy your check and use the account information on it to electronically debit your
account for the amount of the check. The debit from your account will usually take 24 hours and your bank will show it
on your regular account statement.
You will not receive your original check back. We will destroy your original check, but will keep a copy of it. If USCIS
cannot process the EFT for technical reasons, you authorize us to process the copy in place of your original check. If your
check is returned as unpayable, USCIS will re-submit the payment to the financial institution one time. If the check is
returned as unpayable a second time, we will reject your petition and charge you a returned check fee.
How To Check If the Fees Are Correct
Form I-130’s filing fee is current as of the edition date in the lower left corner of this page. However, because USCIS fees
change periodically, you can verify that the fees are correct by following one of the steps below.
1.	 Visit the USCIS website at www.uscis.gov, select “FORMS,” and check the appropriate fee; or
2.	 Call the USCIS National Customer Service Center at 1-800-375-5283 and ask for the fee information. For TTY (deaf
or hard of hearing) call: 1-800-767-1833.
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Where To File?
Please see our website at www.uscis.gov/i-130 or call our National Customer Service Center at 1-800-375-5283 for the
most current information about where to file this petition. For TTY (deaf or hard of hearing) call: 1-800-767-1833.

Address Change
A petitioner who is not a U.S. citizen must notify USCIS of his or her new address within 10 days of moving
from his or her previous residence. For information on filing a change of address, go to the USCIS website at
www.uscis.gov/addresschange or contact the USCIS National Customer Service Center at 1-800-375-5283.
For TTY (deaf or hard of hearing) call: 1-800-767-1833.
NOTE: Do not submit a change of address request to USCIS Lockbox facilities because the Lockbox does not process
change of address requests.

Processing Information
Initial Processing. Once USCIS accepts your petition we will check it for completeness. If you do not completely fill
out this petition, you will not establish a basis for your eligibility and USCIS may reject or deny your petition.
Requests for More Information. We may request that you provide more information or evidence to support your
petition. We may also request that you provide the originals of any copies you submit. USCIS will return any requested
originals when they are no longer needed.
Requests for Interview. We may request that you appear at a USCIS office for an interview based on your petition.
At the time of any interview or other appearance at a USCIS office, we may require that you provide your fingerprints,
photograph, and/or signature to verify your identity and/or update background and security checks.
Decision. The decision on Form I-130 involves a determination of whether you have established eligibility for the
immigration benefit you are seeking. USCIS will notify you of the decision in writing.

USCIS Forms and Information
To ensure you are using the latest version of this petition, visit the USCIS website at www.uscis.gov where you can obtain
the latest USCIS forms and immigration-related information. If you do not have internet access, you may order USCIS
forms by calling the USCIS Contact Center at 1-800-375-5283. The USCIS Contact Center provides information in
English and Spanish. For TTY (deaf or hard of hearing) call: 1-800-767-1833.
Instead of waiting in line for assistance at your local USCIS office, you can schedule an appointment online at
www.uscis.gov. Select “Schedule an appointment online” and follow the screen prompts to set up your appointment.
Once you finish scheduling an appointment, the system will generate an appointment notice for you.

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Penalties
If you knowingly and willfully falsify or conceal a material fact or submit a false document with your Form I-130, we will
deny your Form I-130 and may deny any other immigration benefit. In addition, you will face severe penalties provided
by law and may be subject to criminal prosecution.

USCIS Compliance Review and Monitoring
By signing this petition, you have stated under penalty of perjury (28 U.S.C. section 1746) that all information and
documentation submitted with this petition are complete, true, and correct. You also authorize the release of any
information from your records that USCIS may need to determine your eligibility for the immigration benefit you are
seeking and consent to USCIS verifying such information.
The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has the authority to verify any information you submit to establish
eligibility for the immigration benefit you are seeking at any time. USCIS’ legal authority to verify this information is in
8 U.S.C. sections 1103, 1155, and 1184, and 8 CFR Parts 103, 204, 205, and 214. To ensure compliance with applicable
laws and authorities, USCIS may verify information before or after your case is decided.
Agency verification methods may include, but are not limited to: review of public records and information; contact via
written correspondence, the Internet, facsimile, other electronic transmission, or telephone; unannounced physical site
inspections of residences and locations of employment; and interviews. USCIS will use information obtained through
verification to assess your compliance with the laws and to determine your eligibility for an immigration benefit.
Subject to the restrictions under 8 CFR 103.2(b)(16), USCIS will provide you with an opportunity to address any adverse
or derogatory information that may result from a USCIS compliance review, verification, or site visit after a formal
decision is made on your case or after the agency has initiated an adverse action which may result in revocation or
termination of an approval.

DHS Privacy Notice
AUTHORITIES: The information requested on this petition, and the associated evidence, is collected under the
Immigration and Nationality Act (INA) section 204.
PURPOSE: The primary purpose for providing the requested information on this petition is to determine if you have
established eligibility for the immigration benefit for which you are filing. DHS will use the information you provide to
grant or deny the immigration benefit you are seeking.
DISCLOSURE: The information you provide is voluntary. However failure to provide the requested information,
including your Social Security number, and the requested evidence, may delay a final decision in your case or result in
denial of your petition.
ROUTINE USES: DHS may share the information you provide on this form with other Federal, state, local, and foreign
government agencies and authorized organizations. DHS follows approved routine uses described in the associated
published system of records forms [DHS/USCIS–001 – Alien File, Index, and National File Tracking System and
DHS/USCIS–007 – Benefits Information System] and the published privacy impact assessments [DHS/USCIS/PIA003 Integrated Digitization Document Management Program (IDDMP), DHS/USCIS/PIA-016(a) Computer Linked
Application Information Management System and Associated Systems, and DHS/USCIS/PIA-051 Case and Activity
Management for International Operations], which you can find at www.dhs.gov/privacy. DHS may also share the
information, as appropriate, for law enforcement purposes or in the interest of national security.

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Paperwork Reduction Act
An agency may not conduct or sponsor an information collection, and a person is not required to respond to a collection
of information unless it displays a currently valid Office of Management and Budget (OMB) control number. The
public reporting burden for Form I-130 is estimated at 2 hours per response and Form I-130A is estimated at 50 minutes
per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, gathering the required documentation and information,
completing the forms, preparing statements, attaching necessary documentation, and submitting the forms. The collection
of biometrics is estimated to require 1 hour and 10 minutes. Send comments regarding this burden estimate or any
other aspect of this collection of information, including suggestions for reducing this burden to: U.S. Citizenship and
Immigration Services, Regulatory Coordination Division, Office of Policy and Strategy, 20 Massachusetts Ave NW,
Washington, DC 20529-2140; OMB No. 1615-0012. Do not mail your completed Form I-130 or Form I-130A to this
address.

Checklist
For all Form I-130 petitioners:

□□ Did you answer each question on Form I-130?
□□ Did you sign and date the petition?
□□ Did you enclose the correct filing fee for each petition?
□□ Did you submit proof of your U.S. citizenship or lawful permanent resident status?
□□ Did you submit other required supporting evidence?
□□ If you have an attorney or accredited representative, did you include a completed Form G-28?
For Form I-130 spouse petitioners:

□□ Did you include two photographs of your spouse beneficiary?
□□ Did you include a completed and signed Form I-130A?
□□ Did you include two photographs of you (spouse petitioner)?

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