Arts Supplement to the 2022 General Social Survey

ICR 202110-3135-005

OMB: 3135-0132

Federal Form Document

Forms and Documents
Document
Name
Status
Form and Instruction
Modified
Supplementary Document
2021-11-23
Supporting Statement B
2021-11-23
Supporting Statement A
2021-11-23
Supplementary Document
2021-11-23
IC Document Collections
IC ID
Document
Title
Status
200493 Modified
ICR Details
3135-0132 202110-3135-005
Received in OIRA 201112-3135-001
NEA
Arts Supplement to the 2022 General Social Survey
Reinstatement with change of a previously approved collection   No
Emergency 01/10/2022
11/24/2021
  Requested Previously Approved
6 Months From Approved
1,150 0
172 0
0 0

Arts participation is widely recognized as a positive indicator of social and civic well-being. Historical data on arts participation rates through the Survey for Public Participation in the Arts (OMB Control Number 3135-0136), and the Arts Basic Survey (OMB Control Number 3135-0131)—as collected by the NEA in partnership with the U.S. Census Bureau—have been included in the OMB “Social Indicators” that appear under “Performance and Management” in the President’s annual budget submission. Studies in the U.S. and abroad have established strong positive relationships between arts participation and health and well-being in individuals. Designed by the NEA, the 2022 General Social Survey’s Arts Supplement affords the only current vehicle for reporting how U.S. arts participation has changed as a direct result of the pandemic, and for identifying which population subgroups have not resumed these activities, and which may be underserved, having limited access. The NEA will use these data to fulfill its mission of providing all Americans with diverse opportunities for arts participation, whether in-person or virtually. By tracking changes in arts participation during the pandemic, moreover, the NEA will gain a better understanding of how consumption patterns have affected economic recovery of the nation’s arts sector. In 2019, arts and cultural industries contributed $919.7 billion, or 4.3 percent, of the U.S. Gross Domestic Product (GDP), and accounted for 5.2 million salaried workers, earning total compensation of $446 billion. From 2017 to 2019, arts and cultural production increased at a 3 percent clip, slightly higher than the growth rate for the economy as a whole. A year before COVID-19 hit the U.S., consumers spent $28.5 billion on admissions to performing arts events. Over the last year, academic, government, and industry reports have shown that arts and cultural employers and businesses are among the hardest hit by the pandemic, and likely will be the slowest to recover. In a January 2021 white paper produced for FEMA’s Recovery Support Function Leadership Group, Argonne National Laboratory analysts concluded from multiple data sources that “[a]cross the spectrum of artistic and creative endeavors, restrictions on gatherings, changes in consumer behavior (voluntary or otherwise), and severe unemployment have taken a devastating toll on the sector.” Recognizing both the outsized economic contributions of the arts and the disproportionate effects from the pandemic, Congress passed two successive relief packages (the CARES Act of 2020 and the American Rescue Plan of 2021) that included stimulus funding for arts jobs and arts and cultural venues and facilities. Under both pieces of legislation, the NEA received special funds for the purpose of grantmaking to help the sector in its recovery. The 2022 General Social Survey’s Arts Supplement is a critical instrument for assessing the pace of that recovery, allowing the NEA to learn—by combining the survey results with other data sources—whether social and economic conditions for the arts have improved, as a result of the stimulus funding and other measures, and for which industries and subpopulations. The data will be provided to the public for free through the GSS website as well as through NEA platforms and affiliated platforms, such as the NEA’s data archive: National Archive of Data on Arts & Culture (NADAC). The data also will provide the basis for a range of NEA reports and independent research publications.
This request is for emergency/expedited clearance of an arts-related supplement to the General Social Survey (GSS) to be conducted by the National Opinion Research Center (NORC) in 2022. The NEA seeks expedited/emergency clearance so that the agency can better monitor and report to the public the extent to which arts participation in the United States has been affected uniquely by the COVID-19 pandemic. Arts participation is widely recognized as a positive indicator of social and civic well-being. Designed by the NEA, the 2022 General Social Survey’s Arts Supplement affords the only current vehicle for reporting how U.S. arts participation has changed as a direct result of the pandemic, and for identifying which population subgroups have not resumed these activities, and which may be underserved, having limited access. The NEA will use these data to fulfill its mission of providing all Americans with diverse opportunities for arts participation, whether in-person or virtually. By tracking changes in arts participation during the pandemic, moreover, the NEA will gain a better understanding of how consumption patterns have affected economic recovery of the nation’s arts sector. Over the last year, academic, government, and industry reports have shown that arts and cultural employers and businesses are among the hardest hit by the pandemic, and likely will be the slowest to recover. Recognizing both the outsized economic contributions of the arts and the disproportionate effects from the pandemic, Congress passed two successive relief packages (the CARES Act of 2020 and the American Rescue Plan of 2021) that included stimulus funding for arts jobs and arts and cultural venues and facilities. Under both pieces of legislation, the NEA received special funds for the purpose of grantmaking to help the sector in its recovery. The 2022 General Social Survey’s Arts Supplement is a critical instrument for assessing the pace of that recovery, allowing the NEA to learn—by combining the survey results with other data sources—whether social and economic conditions for the arts have improved, as a result of the stimulus funding and other measures, and for which industries and subpopulations. The data will be provided to the public for free through the GSS website as well as through NEA platforms and affiliated platforms, such as the NEA’s data archive: National Archive of Data on Arts & Culture (NADAC). The data also will provide the basis for a range of NEA reports and independent research publications. The emergency justification memo submitted to the NEA's OMB Desk Officer is included in Attachment D.

US Code: 20 USC Section 954 (5)
  
None

Not associated with rulemaking

  86 FR 58961 10/25/2021
No

1
IC Title Form No. Form Name
2022 GSS Arts Supplement Questionnaire 1 2022 GSS Arts Supplement Questionnaire

  Total Request Previously Approved Change Due to New Statute Change Due to Agency Discretion Change Due to Adjustment in Estimate Change Due to Potential Violation of the PRA
Annual Number of Responses 1,150 0 0 -1,680 0 2,830
Annual Time Burden (Hours) 172 0 0 7 0 165
Annual Cost Burden (Dollars) 0 0 0 0 0 0
Yes
Miscellaneous Actions
No
The arts-related supplement to the 2022 GSS is a new data collection, based on previous GSS arts supplement collections, that will provide data for comparison with prior GSS surveys, but also will include new data points on the level of arts participation during the COVID-19 pandemic and changes in arts participation across multiple years of the pandemic.

$300,000
Yes Part B of Supporting Statement
    No
    No
No
No
No
Yes
Melissa Menzer 202 682-5548 [email protected]

  No

On behalf of this Federal agency, I certify that the collection of information encompassed by this request complies with 5 CFR 1320.9 and the related provisions of 5 CFR 1320.8(b)(3).
The following is a summary of the topics, regarding the proposed collection of information, that the certification covers:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
    (i) Why the information is being collected;
    (ii) Use of information;
    (iii) Burden estimate;
    (iv) Nature of response (voluntary, required for a benefit, or mandatory);
    (v) Nature and extent of confidentiality; and
    (vi) Need to display currently valid OMB control number;
 
 
 
If you are unable to certify compliance with any of these provisions, identify the item by leaving the box unchecked and explain the reason in the Supporting Statement.
11/24/2021


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