Federal Acquisition Regulation Part 46 Requirements - FAR Sections Affected: 52.246-2 thru 52.426-8, 52.246-12, 52.246-15, and 52.246-26

ICR 202209-9000-001

OMB: 9000-0077

Federal Form Document

Forms and Documents
Document
Name
Status
Supporting Statement A
2022-09-14
IC Document Collections
ICR Details
9000-0077 202209-9000-001
Received in OIRA 201909-9000-003
FAR
Federal Acquisition Regulation Part 46 Requirements - FAR Sections Affected: 52.246-2 thru 52.426-8, 52.246-12, 52.246-15, and 52.246-26
Revision of a currently approved collection   No
Regular 09/14/2022
  Requested Previously Approved
36 Months From Approved 10/31/2022
9,301 2,229
33,015 1,910
2,581,446 71,511

These FAR clauses require the contractor to provide and maintain an inspection system that is acceptable to the Government, and to keep complete records of all inspection work performed and make it available to the Government. These clauses give the Government the right to inspect and test all work. Records required under these clauses are kept as a part of a contractor’s normal business operations. To ensure they provide a quality product or service, every business must have standards and methods for reviewing or inspecting the quality of their product or service. These standards will differ by industry and the complexity of the product or service provided. The Government relies on a contractor's existing quality assurance system for contracts for commercial products. The Government relies on the contractor to accomplish all inspection and testing needed to ensure that acquired commercial services conform to contract requirements before they are tendered to the Government. See FAR 12.208 and 46.202-1. Likewise, when the contract amount is expected to be less than the simplified acquisition threshold (SAT), these clauses do not apply. The FAR “inspection clauses” are used for quality assurance depending on the type of contract, or the product or service being provided. These clauses do not require the transmittal or sending of documentation to the Government, but they have record keeping requirements. The Government may review these records to confirm the contract quality requirements are being met. This review is risk-based and may or may not include the review of all quality assurance records. Generally, the records are more likely to be reviewed when the contractor is not meeting quality standards or as part of Government Contract quality assurance surveillance for complex requirements. Subject matter experts estimate these records are requested from 10% or fewer of contractors. ● FAR 52.246-15, Certificate of Conformance. This clause requires the contractor to complete and sign a certificate of conformance (CoC). This clause is used in solicitations and contracts for supplies or services at the discretion of the contracting officer when it is in the Government's interest, small losses would be incurred in the event of a defect; or because of the contractor's reputation or past performance, or when it is likely that the supplies or services furnished will be acceptable and any defective work would be replaced, corrected, or repaired without contest. ● FAR 52.246-26, Reporting Nonconforming Items. This clause requires contractors to provide written notification to the contracting officer within 60 days of becoming aware or having reason to suspect, such as through inspection, testing, record review, or notification from another source (e.g., seller, customer, third party) that any end item, component, subassembly, part, or material contained in supplies purchased by the contractor for delivery to, or for, the Government is counterfeit or suspect counterfeit. This clause requires certain contractors to submit a report to the Government-Industry Data Exchange Program (GIDEP) system at www.gidep.org within 60 days of becoming aware or having reason to suspect, such as through inspection, testing, record review, or notification from another source (e.g., seller, customer, third party) that an item purchased by the contractor for delivery to, or for, the Government is a counterfeit or suspect counterfeit item; or a common item that has a major or critical nonconformance.

None
None

Not associated with rulemaking

  87 FR 40842 07/08/2022
87 FR 56424 09/14/2022
No

3
IC Title Form No. Form Name
Certificate of Conformance
FAR Inspection Clauses (52.246-2 thru 52.426-8, and 52.246-12
Reporting Nonconforming Items

  Total Request Previously Approved Change Due to New Statute Change Due to Agency Discretion Change Due to Adjustment in Estimate Change Due to Potential Violation of the PRA
Annual Number of Responses 9,301 2,229 0 7,072 0 0
Annual Time Burden (Hours) 33,015 1,910 0 31,105 0 0
Annual Cost Burden (Dollars) 2,581,446 71,511 0 2,509,935 0 0
Yes
Miscellaneous Actions
No
Adjustments are made to the public and Government burden estimates based on the following: ● The estimated number of respondents and responses per year are based on the latest data available as described in Item 12. ● The estimated cost to the public and to the Government was updated based on use of calendar year 2022 OPM GS wage rates for the rest of the United States. ● The consolidation with OMB control number 9000-0187.

$484,950
No
    No
    No
No
No
No
No
Edward Loeb 2025010650 [email protected]

  No

On behalf of this Federal agency, I certify that the collection of information encompassed by this request complies with 5 CFR 1320.9 and the related provisions of 5 CFR 1320.8(b)(3).
The following is a summary of the topics, regarding the proposed collection of information, that the certification covers:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
    (i) Why the information is being collected;
    (ii) Use of information;
    (iii) Burden estimate;
    (iv) Nature of response (voluntary, required for a benefit, or mandatory);
    (v) Nature and extent of confidentiality; and
    (vi) Need to display currently valid OMB control number;
 
 
 
If you are unable to certify compliance with any of these provisions, identify the item by leaving the box unchecked and explain the reason in the Supporting Statement.
09/14/2022


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