Form N-400 Naturalization Application Instructions

Instructions for Application for Naturalization

Form N-400, Application for Naturalization, is an application to become a naturalized U.S. citizen. If your biological or legal adoptive mother or father is a U.S. citizen by birth, or was naturalized before you reached your 18th birthday, you may already be a U.S. citizen. Before you consider filing this application, please visit the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) website at www.uscis.gov for more information on this topic and to review the instructions for Form N-600, Application for Ce

OMB: 1615-0052

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Instructions for Application for Naturalization
Department of Homeland Security
U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services

USCIS
Form N-400

OMB No. 1615-0052
Expires 09/30/2022

What Is the Purpose of Form N-400?
Form N-400, Application for Naturalization, is an application to become a naturalized U.S. citizen.
If your biological or legal adoptive mother or father is a U.S. citizen by birth, or was naturalized before you reached
your 18th birthday, you may already be a U.S. citizen. Before you consider filing this application, please visit the U.S.
Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) website at www.uscis.gov for more information on this topic and to
review the instructions for Form N-600, Application for Certificate of Citizenship, and Form N-600K, Application for
Citizenship and Issuance of Certificate Under Section 322.
If either of your parents is a United States citizen, complete Part 6. Information About Your Parents as part of this
application. If neither of your parents is a United States citizen, skip Part 6. and complete Part 7. Biographical
Information.

A Guide to Naturalization
To help you understand the naturalization process, USCIS developed A Guide to Naturalization (M-476). This guide
provides information on eligibility requirements and naturalization procedures. If you do not already have a photocopy of
M-476, you can view the guide on the USCIS website at www.uscis.gov.
You may visit the USCIS website at www.uscis.gov/N-400 for filing tips and additional resources to assist you during the
naturalization process.

General Eligibility Requirements
You may apply for naturalization when you meet all the requirements to become a U.S. citizen. General eligibility
requirements are the following:
1.	 You are at least 18 years of age at the time of filing (except active duty members of the U.S. Armed Forces);
2.	 You are a permanent resident of the United States for a required period of time;
3.	 You have lived within the state or USCIS district where you claim residence for at least 3 months prior to filing;
4.	 You have demonstrated physical presence within the United States for a required period of time;
5.	 You have demonstrated continuous residence for a required period of time;
6.	 You demonstrate good moral character;
7.	 You demonstrate an attachment to the principles and ideals of the U.S. Constitution;
8.	 You demonstrate a basic knowledge of U.S. history and government (also known as “civics”) as well as an ability to
read, write, speak and understand basic English; and
9.	 You take an Oath of Allegiance to the United States. Some applicants may be eligible for a modified oath.

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Naturalization Testing
One of the requirements for naturalization is to take the naturalization test to demonstrate that you are able to read, write,
and speak basic English and that you have a basic knowledge of U.S. history and government (civics).
Exemptions From the English Language Test
You are not required to take the English language test if:
1.	 At the time of filing your Form N-400, you are 50 years of age or older and have lived in the United States as a
permanent resident for periods totaling at least 20 years. You do not have to take the English language test, but you do
have to take the civics test in the language of your choice.
2.	 At the time of filing your Form N-400, you are 55 years of age or older and have lived in the United States as a
permanent resident for periods totaling at least 15 years. You do not have to take the English language test, but you do
have to take the civics test in the language of your choice.
3.	 At the time of filing your Form N-400, you are 65 years of age or older and have lived in the United States as a
permanent resident for periods totaling at least 20 years. You do not have to take the English language test, but you do
have to take the civics test in the language of your choice.
NOTE: If you qualify for an exemption from the English language test based on your age and how long you have lived
in the United States as a lawful permanent resident, you should answer “Yes” to at least one question in Part 2., Item
Number 13. of Form N-400.
Medical Exception to the English Language and/or Civics Test
You may be eligible for an exception to the English language and/or civics tests due to a physical or developmental
disability or mental impairment that has lasted, or is expected to last, 12 months or more. Refer to Form N-648, Medical
Certification for Disability Exceptions, for more information.
NOTE: If you are requesting a medical exception to the English language and civics tests, answer “Yes” in Part 2., Item
Number 12. of Form N-400. Submit a completed Form N-648 when you file your Form N-400.

Who Should Not File Form N-400
You should not file this form if:
1.	 You have not met the eligibility requirements for naturalization based on your filing category.
2.	 You have acquired or derived U.S. citizenship through one or both of your parents or are eligible for citizenship under
Immigration and Nationality Act (INA) 322. Visit the USCIS website at www.uscis.gov for more information on this
topic and to review the instructions for Form N-600, Application for Certificate of Citizenship, and Form N-600K,
Application for Citizenship and Issuance of Certificate Under Section 322.

General Instructions
USCIS provides forms free of charge through the USCIS website. In order to view, print, or fill out our forms, you should
use the latest version of Adobe Reader, which you can download for free at http://get.adobe.com/reader/. If you do not
have Internet access, you may call the USCIS National Customer Service Center at 1-800-375-5283 and ask that we mail
a form to you. For TTY (deaf or hard of hearing) call 1-800-767-1833.

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Signature. Each application must be properly completed, signed, and filed. For all signatures on this application, USCIS
will not accept a stamped or typewritten name in place of a handwritten signature. A legal guardian may sign for a
mentally incompetent person.
Filing Fee. Each application must be accompanied by the appropriate filing fee and biometric services fee (if applicable).
(See the What Is the Filing Fee section of these Instructions.)
Evidence. At the time of filing, you must submit all evidence and supporting documentation listed in the Required
Evidence section of these Instructions.
Biometrics Services Appointment. USCIS may require that you appear for an interview or provide fingerprints,
photograph, and/or signature at any time to verify your identity, obtain additional information, and conduct background
and security checks, including a check of criminal history records maintained by the Federal Bureau of Investigation
(FBI), before making a decision on your application. After USCIS receives your application and ensures it is complete,
we will inform you in writing if you need to attend a biometric services appointment. If an appointment is necessary, the
notice will provide you the location of your local or designated USCIS Application Support Center (ASC) and the date
and time of your appointment or, if you are currently overseas, instruct you to contact a U.S. Embassy, U.S. Consulate, or
USCIS office outside the United States to set up an appointment.
If you are required to provide biometrics, at your appointment you must sign an oath reaffirming that:
1.	 You provided or authorized all information in the application; and
2.	 You reviewed and understood all of the information contained in, and submitted with, your application; and
3.	 All of this information was complete, true, and correct at the time of filing.
If you fail to attend your biometric services appointment, USCIS may deny your application.
Copies. You should submit legible photocopies of documents requested, unless the Instructions specifically state that you
must submit an original document. USCIS may request an original document at the time of filing or at any time during
processing of an application, petition, or request. If USCIS requests an original document from you, it will be returned to
you after USCIS determines it no longer needs your original.
NOTE: If you submit original documents when not required or requested by USCIS, your original documents may be
immediately destroyed upon receipt.
Translations. If you submit a document with information in a foreign language, you must also submit a full English
translation. The translator must sign a certification that the English language translation is complete and accurate, and that
he or she is competent to translate from the foreign language into English.
How To Fill Out Form N-400
1.	 Type or print legibly in black ink.
2.	 If you need extra space to complete any item in this application; use and attach a separate sheet of paper; type or
print your name and Alien Registration Number (A-Number) (if any) at the top of each sheet; and indicate the Page
Number, Part Number, and Item Number to which your answer refers.
3.	 Answer all questions fully and accurately. If a question does not apply to you (for example, if you have never been
married and the question asks “Provide the name of your current spouse”), type or print “N/A,” unless otherwise
directed. If your answer to a question, which requires a numeric response, is zero or none (for example, “How many
children do you have” or “How many times have you departed the United States”), type or print “None,” unless
otherwise directed.

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4.	 Avoid highlighting, crossing out, or typing or printing outside the area provided for a response. If you must make
substantial corrections to your Form N-400, USCIS recommends that you start a new Form N-400 rather than using
correction tape or fluid to correct the information. USCIS scanners may see through the white correction tape or fluid.
This may lead to incorrect information being captured in USCIS systems, which may cause processing delays or a
rejection (non-acceptance) of your Form N-400.
5.	 Provide your A-Number on the top right corner of each page (if any). Your A-Number is located on your Permanent
Resident Card (formerly known as the Alien Registration Card). The A-Number on your card consists of a seven to
nine digit number, depending on when your record was created. If the A-Number on your card has fewer than nine
digits, place enough zeros before the first number to make a total of nine digits on Form N-400. For example, type or
print number A1234567 as A001234567 or type or print number A12345678 as A012345678.
6.	 Your application must be properly completed, signed, and filed. You must include all pages when you file Form
N-400, even if the pages are blank. A photocopy of the application is acceptable as long as all signatures on the
application are handwritten and original. USCIS will not accept a stamped or typewritten name in place of a
signature.
Early Filing. An applicant filing under the general naturalization provision (section 316(a) of the INA) may file his or
her application up to 90 days before he or she would first meet the required 5-year period of continuous residence as a
lawful permanent resident (LPR). An applicant filing as the spouse of a U.S. citizen under section 319(a) of the INA may
file up to 90 days before meeting the required 3-year period of continuous residence as an LPR. Although an applicant
may file early according to the 90-day early filing provision, the applicant is not eligible for naturalization until he or she
has reached the required 3- or 5-year period of continuous residence as an LPR. Applicants filing up to 90 days before
meeting the continuous residence requirement must still meet all other requirements for naturalization at the time of filing
Form N-400. For example, an applicant filing under section 319(a) of the INA must meet all other requirements as the
spouse of a U.S. citizen at the time of filing.

Specific Instructions
This form is divided into 18 parts.
Part 1. Information About Your Eligibility
Select the box that applies to you. Select only one box. If you select more than one box, your Form N-400 may be
delayed.
NOTE: If you are a lawful permanent resident of the United States, and you are the spouse of a U.S. citizen, and
your U.S. citizen spouse is regularly engaged in specified employment abroad (Section 319(b) of the INA), and you
were authorized to accompany and reside with your spouse abroad, you do not qualify to naturalize overseas and
must be present in the United States at the time of interview and naturalization. Therefore, type or print the name
of the USCIS Field Office where you would like to have your naturalization interview. Visit the USCIS website at
www.uscis.gov/about-us/find-uscis-office/field-offices to find a USCIS Field Office.
Part 2. Information About You (Person applying for naturalization)
Item Number 1. Your Current Legal Name. Your current legal name is the name on your birth certificate unless it
changed after birth by a legal action such as a marriage or court order. Do not provide a nickname.
Item Number 2. Your Name Exactly As It Appears on Your Permanent Resident Card (if applicable). Type or
print your name exactly as it appears on your Permanent Resident Card even if it is misspelled or has changed through
marriage, divorce, or other court order since you received your card. Type or print “N/A” if you do not have a Permanent
Resident Card.

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Item Number 3. Other Names You Have Used Since Birth (include nicknames, aliases, and maiden name, if
applicable). If you have used any other names or aliases, provide them in this section. If you need extra space to
complete this section, use a separate sheet of paper.
Item Number 4. Name Change (Optional). A court can allow you to change your name when you are naturalized. Any
name change you request on this application will not be final until you are naturalized by the court. If you want the court
to change your name at your naturalization oath ceremony, select “Yes” and complete this section. You do not need to
request a name change if your name has changed through marriage, divorce, or other court order.
NOTE: USCIS cannot process name change requests for members of the military, or their spouses, who are naturalizing
overseas.
Item Number 5. U.S. Social Security Number (if applicable). Provide your U.S. Social Security number. Type or print
“N/A” if you do not have one.
Item Number 6. USCIS Online Account Number (if any). If you have previously filed an application, petition, or
request using the USCIS online filing system (previously called USCIS Electronic Immigration System (USCIS ELIS)),
provide the USCIS Online Account Number you were issued by the system. You can find your USCIS Online Account
Number by logging in to your account and going to the profile page. If you previously filed certain applications, petitions,
or requests on a paper form via a USCIS Lockbox facility, you may have received a USCIS Online Account Access Notice
issuing you a USCIS Online Account Number. If you received such a notice, your USCIS Online Account Number can be
found at the top of the notice. If you were issued a USCIS Online Account Number, enter it in the space provided. The
USCIS Online Account Number is not the same as an A-Number.
Item Number 7. Gender. Indicate if you are male or female.
Item Number 8. Date of Birth. Always use eight numbers to show your date of birth. Type or print the date in this
order: Month, Day, Year. For example, type or print May 1, 1958, as 05/01/1958. USCIS will reject your Form N-400 if
you do not provide your date of birth.
Item Number 9. Date You Became a Lawful Permanent Resident (if applicable). Provide the official date when your
permanent residence began as shown on your Permanent Resident Card (formerly known as the Alien Registration Card).
Provide the date in this order: Month, Day, Year. For example, type or print August 9, 1988, as 08/09/1988. USCIS may
reject your application if you are a lawful permanent resident and do not provide the date you became a lawful permanent
resident.
NOTE: You need both your USCIS A-Number and your permanent resident date to file Form N-400. Where applicable,
if you do not have this information, you should schedule an appointment to obtain this information before you file your
Form N-400.
Item Number 10. Country of Birth. Type or print the name of the country in which you were born. Use the name of
the country at the time of your birth, even if the name of the country has changed.
Item Number 11. Country of Citizenship or Nationality. Type or print the name of the country as it currently exists,
where you are currently a citizen or national. If the country no longer exists, type or print the current name of the country
with current authority.
1.	 If you are stateless, type or print the name of the country, as it currently exists, where you were last a citizen or national.
2.	 If you are a citizen or national of more than one country, type or print the name of the foreign country that issued your
last passport.
Item Number 12. Do you have a physical or developmental disability or mental impairment that prevents you
from demonstrating your knowledge and understanding of the English language and/or civics requirements for
naturalization? Select “Yes” if you are requesting an exception to the English language and/or civics tests based on a
physical or developmental disability or mental impairment that prevents you from complying with the English language
and/or civics requirements for naturalization. Submit Form N-648, Medical Certification for Disability Exceptions, as an
attachment to your Form N-400.
NOTE: Submitting a Form N-648 does not guarantee you will be exempted from the testing requirements.
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Item Number 13. Exemptions from the English Language Test. Depending on your age and the length of time
you have been a lawful permanent resident, you may not be required to take the English language test. Refer to the
Naturalization Testing, Exemptions From the English Language Test, section of these Instructions for more
information (page 2 of 18).
Part 3. Accommodations for Individuals with Disabilities and/or Impairments
USCIS is committed to providing reasonable accommodations for qualified individuals with disabilities and/or
impairments that will help them fully participate in USCIS programs and benefits. Reasonable accommodations vary with
each disability and/or impairment. They may involve modifications to practices or procedures. There are various types of
reasonable accommodations that USCIS may offer. Examples include but are not limited to:
1.	 If you are deaf or hard of hearing, USCIS may provide you with a sign-language interpreter at an interview or other
immigration benefit-related appointment;
2.	 If you are blind or have low vision, USCIS may permit you to take a test orally rather than in writing; or
3.	 If you are unable to travel to a designated USCIS location for an interview, USCIS may visit you at your home or
hospital to conduct the naturalization interview.
If you believe that you need USCIS to accommodate your disability and/or impairment, select “Yes” and then any
applicable box in Items A. - C. in Item Number 1. that describes the nature of your disabilities and/or impairments.
Also, describe the types of accommodations you are requesting on the lines provided. If you are requesting a signlanguage interpreter, indicate for which language (for example American Sign Language). If you need extra space to
complete this section, use a separate sheet of paper.
NOTE: All domestic USCIS facilities meet the Accessibility Guidelines of the Americans with Disabilities Act, so you
do not need to contact USCIS to request an accommodation for physical access to a domestic USCIS office. However, in
Part 3., Item C. in Item Number 1. of this application, you can indicate whether you use a wheelchair. This will allow
USCIS to better prepare for your visit.
NOTE: USCIS also ensures that limited English proficient (LEP) individuals are provided meaningful access at an
interview or other immigration benefit-related appointment, unless otherwise prohibited by law. LEP individuals may
bring a qualified interpreter to the interview.
USCIS considers requests for reasonable accommodations on a case-by-case basis, and we will make our best efforts to
reasonably accommodate your disabilities and/or impairments. USCIS will not exclude you from participating in USCIS
programs or deny your application because of your disabilities and/or impairments. Requesting and/or receiving an
accommodation will not affect your eligibility for an immigration benefit.
Part 4. Information to Contact You
Provide your current telephone numbers as well as your current email address. Type or print “N/A” if an item is not
applicable or if the answer is “none” unless otherwise indicated. If you are hearing impaired and use a TTY telephone
connection, indicate this by writing “TTY” after the telephone number.
Part 5. Information About Your Residence
List every address where you have lived during the last 5 years (including other countries) prior to filing your Form
N-400. Start with where you live now, and then include the dates for each place you have lived in a month, day, and year
format (mm/dd/yyyy). For example, type or print May 1, 1998 to June 1, 1999 as 05/01/1998 to 06/01/1999.
Provide your mailing address if it is different from your current address. Provide “In Care Of Name” information, if
applicable.
If you do not have a State or Province, enter the name of your city again in that box. If you do not have a ZIP or Postal
Code, enter “00000” in the ZIP or Postal Code box.

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NOTE: USCIS may not be able to contact you if you do not provide a complete and valid mailing address. If USCIS
rejects your Form N-400, USCIS may not be able to return the fee for the Form N-400 to you if you do not provide a
complete and valid mailing address.
If you are residing outside of the United States, filing under INA section 319(b), and you want USCIS to collect your
biometrics in the United States, then you must provide an address in the United States. USCIS will send a letter to your
U.S. mailing address notifying you when and where to go for your biometrics services appointment.
If you are a victim of domestic violence, you are not required to disclose the confidential address of a shelter or safe
house. If you are residing in a shelter or safe house at the time of filing this application or you do not feel safe providing
your current address, you may provide a “safe address” where you are able to receive mail. Do not provide a Post Office
Box number unless that is your only address. If you are not currently residing in a shelter or safe house, but have resided
in a shelter or safe house for part of the reporting period, you may provide just the name of the city and state of residence
for the shelter or safe house. Further clarification, if needed, will occur at the interview.
Part 6. Information About Your Parents
If neither one of your parents is a United States citizen, skip this part and go to Part 7.
Citizenship of Parents. Complete Item Numbers 1., 2., and 3. in Part 6. Select “No” if your mother or father are not
U.S. citizens and proceed to the next Item Number or Part as directed on the form.
If one or both of your parents is a U.S. citizen, select “Yes” and complete Items A. - E. in Item Number 2. (mother’s
citizenship) and Items A. - E. in Item Number 3. (father’s citizenship) in Part 6.
Part 7. Biographic Information
Provide the biographic information requested in Part 7., Item Numbers 1. - 6. Providing this information as part of
your application may reduce the time you spend at your USCIS ASC appointment as described in the Biometric Services
Appointment section of these Instructions.
Item Numbers 1. - 2. Ethnicity and Race. Select the boxes that best describe your ethnicity and race.
Categories and Definitions for Ethnicity and Race
1.	 Hispanic or Latino. A person of Cuban, Mexican, Puerto Rican, South or Central American, or other Spanish culture
or origin, regardless of race. (NOTE: This category is only included under Ethnicity in Part 7., Item Number 1.)
2.	 White. A person having origins in any of the original peoples of Europe, the Middle East, or North Africa.
3.	 Asian. A person having origins in any of the original peoples of the Far East, Southeast Asia, or the Indian
subcontinent including, for example, Cambodia, China, India, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Pakistan, the Philippine
Islands, Thailand, and Vietnam.
4.	 Black or African American. A person having origins in any of the black racial groups of Africa.
5.	 American Indian or Alaska Native. A person having origins in any of the original peoples of North and South
America (including Central America), and who maintains tribal affiliation or community attachment.
6.	 Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander. A person having origins in any of the original peoples of Hawaii,
Guam, Samoa, or other Pacific Islands.
Item Number 3. Height. Select the values that best match your height in feet and inches. For example, if you are five
feet and nine inches, select “5” for feet and “09” for inches. Do not enter your height in meters or centimeters. If you do
so, your Form N-400 may be delayed.
Item Number 4. Weight. Enter your weight in pounds. If you do not know your weight, or need to enter a weight under
30 pounds or over 699 pounds, enter “000.” Do not enter your weight in kilograms.
Item Number 5. Eye Color. Select the box that best describes the color of your eyes.
Item Number 6. Hair Color. Select the box that best describes the color of your hair.
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Part 8. Information About Your Employment and Schools You Attended
List where you have worked or attended school full time or part time during the last 5 years. Provide information for the
complete time period. Include all military, police, and/or intelligence service.
Begin by providing information about your current and most recent employment, studies, or unemployment, if applicable.
Provide the locations and dates where you worked, were self-employed, were unemployed, or have studied during the last
5 years. If you worked for yourself, write “self-employed.” If you were unemployed, write “unemployed.”
Part 9. Time Outside the United States
Item Number 1. Provide the total number of days (24 hours or longer) you spent outside the United States during the last
5 years.
Item Number 2. Provide the total number of trips (24 hours or longer) you have taken outside the United States during
the last 5 years.
Item Number 3. Provide information for every trip (24 hours or longer) you have taken outside the United States during
the last 5 years. Start with your most recent trip and work backwards.
Part 10. Information About Your Marital History
Item Number 1. What is your current marital status? Select your marital status on the date you file your Form N-400.
If you are single and have never been married, go to Part 11. Information About Your Children.
Item Number 2. If you are married, is your spouse a current member of the U.S. Armed Forces? If you are married,
indicate if your spouse is a current member of the U.S. Armed Forces.
Item Number 3. How many times have you been married (including annulled marriages, marriages to other people,
and marriages to the same person)? Type or print the number of times you were married. If you were married to the same
person more than one time, count each time as a separate marriage.
Item Number 4. If you are now married, provide the requested information about your current spouse.
Item Number 5. Is your current spouse a U.S. citizen? Select the box to indicate whether your current spouse is a U.S.
citizen.
Item Number 6. If your current spouse became a U.S. citizen after birth, select the box that indicates when your spouse
became a U.S. citizen and provide the date he or she became a U.S. citizen.
Item Number 7. Provide the requested information if your spouse is not a U.S. citizen.
Item Number 8. How many times has your current spouse been married (including annulled marriages, marriages to
other people, and marriages to the same person)? If your current spouse has been married before, provide the following
information about your current spouse’s prior spouse including your current spouse’s prior spouse’s full legal name,
immigration status (if known), date of birth, country of birth, country of citizenship or nationality, date of marriage with
prior spouse, date marriage ended with prior spouse, and how the marriage ended with prior spouse. If your current
spouse had more than one previous marriage, use a separate sheet of paper to provide the information requested. If
your spouse was married to the same person more than one time, provide the requested information about each marriage
separately.
Item Number 9. If you were married before, provide the requested information about your prior spouse including full
legal name, immigration status (if known), date of birth, country of birth, country of citizenship or nationality, date of
marriage with prior spouse, date marriage ended with prior spouse, and how the marriage ended with prior spouse. If you
have more than one previous marriage, provide that information on a separate sheet of paper. If you were married to the
same person more than one time, provide the requested information about each marriage separately.
Part 11. Information About Your Children

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Item Number 1. Indicate your total number of children. Count all of your children, regardless of whether they are alive,
missing, deceased; born in other countries or in the United States; under 18 years of age or over 18 years of age; married
or unmarried; living with you or elsewhere; current stepchildren; legally adopted children; or children born when you
were not married.
Item Number 2. Provide information about all your children listed in Item Number 1., regardless of age. If needed, use
a separate sheet of paper to provide the information requested. Provide the following information for each child including
the child’s current legal name; A-Number (if applicable); date of birth; country of birth (type or print the name of the
country at the time of your child’s birth, even if the name changed); relationship to you (for example, biological child,
stepchild, legally adopted child); and current address.
1.	 If your son or daughter is living with you, type or print “Child Residing With Me” in the space provided for the child’s
address;
2.	 If your son or daughter is not living with you, type or print the address where your child resides; or
3.	 If your son or daughter is missing or deceased, type or print “Child Missing” or “Child Deceased” in the space
provided for the address.
Part 12. Additional Information About You (Person Applying for Naturalization)
Item Numbers 1. - 50. Answer each question by selecting “Yes” or “No,” where applicable. If any part of a question
applies to you or has ever applied to you, you must answer “Yes.” If you answer “Yes” to any of the questions in Item
Numbers 1. - 44. in this part, include a typed or printed explanation on a separate sheet of paper. You may also provide
evidence to support your answers. If you answer “No” to any question in Item Numbers 45. - 50., include a typed or
printed explanation on a separate sheet of paper. Your answers, whether “Yes” or “No,” will not automatically cause your
application to be denied.
Part 13. Applicant’s Statement, Certification, and Signature
Item Numbers 1. - 6. Select the appropriate box to indicate whether you read this application yourself or whether you
had an interpreter assist you. If someone assisted you in completing the application, select the box indicating that you
used a preparer. Further, you must sign and date your application. Every application MUST contain the signature of
the applicant (or parent or legal guardian, if applicable). A stamped or typewritten name in place of a signature is not
acceptable. You may place an “X” mark instead of a signature if you are unable to write in any language. USCIS will
reject your Form N-400 if it is not signed.
Part 14. Interpreter’s Contact Information, Certification, and Signature
Item Numbers 1. - 7. If you used anyone as an interpreter to read the Instructions and questions on this application to
you in a language in which you are fluent, the interpreter must fill out this section, provide his or her name, the name and
address of his or her business or organization (if any), his or her daytime telephone number, his or her mobile telephone
number (if any), and his or her email address (if any). The interpreter must sign and date the application.
Part 15. Contact Information, Declaration, and Signature of the Person Preparing this Application, if Other Than
the Applicant
Item Numbers 1. - 8. This section must contain the signature of the person who completed your application, if other
than you, the applicant. If the same individual acted as your interpreter and your preparer, that person should complete
both Part 14. and Part 15. If the person who completed this application is associated with a business or organization,
that person should complete the business or organization name and address information. Anyone who helped you
complete this application MUST sign and date the application. A stamped or typewritten name in place of a signature is
not acceptable. If the person who helped you prepare your application is an attorney or accredited representative whose
representation extends beyond preparation of the application, he or she may be obliged to also submit a completed Form
G-28, Notice of Entry of Appearance as Attorney or Accredited Representative, along with your application. USCIS will
reject your Form N-400 if it is not signed by the preparer you used to prepare the questions on the application.

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NOTE: Do not complete Parts 16., 17., and 18. until a USCIS Officer instructs you to do so at the
interview.
Part 16. Signature at Interview
Do not complete this part. The USCIS Officer will ask you to complete this part at your interview.
Part 17. Renunciation of Foreign Titles
Do not complete this part until a USCIS Officer instructs you to do so at your interview.
Most people do not have a foreign hereditary title or order of nobility. This part will apply only if you answered “Yes” to
Part 12., Items A. and B., in Item Number 4. If you do have a hereditary title or order of nobility, the law requires you
to renounce this title as part of your oath ceremony to become a U.S. citizen. In Part 17. you must affirm you are ready to
do so.
Part 18. Oath of Allegiance
Do not complete this part. The USCIS Officer will ask you to complete this part at your interview.
If USCIS approves your application, you must take this Oath of Allegiance to become a U.S. citizen. In limited
cases, you can take a modified oath. The oath requirement cannot be waived unless you are unable to understand its
meaning because of a physical or developmental disability or mental impairment. For more information, see A Guide to
Naturalization (M-476). Your signature on this application only indicates that you have no objections to taking the Oath
of Allegiance. It does not mean that you have taken the oath or that you are naturalized. If USCIS approves your Form
N-400 for naturalization, you must attend an oath ceremony and take the Oath of Allegiance to the United States.
We recommend that you print or save a photocopy of your completed application to review in the future and
for your records.

Required Evidence
Below is a list of documents to submit with your Form N-400.
1.	 Photographs. Only applicants who reside overseas must provide two identical color photographs of yourself taken
recently. The photos must have a white to off-white background, be printed on thin paper with a glossy finish, and
be unmounted and unretouched. Passport-style photos must be 2” x 2”. The photos must be in color with full face,
frontal view on a white to off-white background. Head height should measure 1” to 1 3/8” from top of hair to bottom
of chin, and eye height is between 1 1/8” to 1 3/8” from bottom of photo. Your head must be bare, unless contrary to
your religious beliefs. Using a pencil or felt pen, lightly print your name and A-Number (if any) on the back of the
photo.
2.	 Photocopy of Permanent Resident Card. Provide a photocopy of the front and back of your Form I-551 (Permanent
Resident Card). USCIS must be able to read the information on the photocopy. If you have lost your Form I-551,
attach a photocopy of any other entry document or a photocopy of a receipt showing that you have filed Form I-90,
Application to Replace Permanent Resident Card.
3.	 Photocopy of your Current Legal Marital Status Document. Provide a photocopy of your current marriage
certificate, divorce, annulment decree, or death certificate of former spouse.
4.	 Documents for Military Personnel or Spouses of Military Personnel:
A.	 Form N-426 (Request for Certification of Military or Naval Service). If you are a current member of the U.S.
Armed Forces, provide a completed and certified Form N-426. If you are separated from the military, provide an
uncertified Form N-426.

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B.	 Evidence of Military Service. If you ever served in the U.S. Armed Forces, provide a Certificate of Release or
Discharge from Active Duty, DD Form 214, for all periods of service. If you are currently serving in an active
duty status within the United States or abroad, you should submit a photocopy of your official military orders.
C.	 Spouses of Military Personnel have additional requirements. Refer to Naturalization Information for Military
Personnel (M-599) for eligibility requirements. You can obtain this information on the USCIS website at
www.uscis.gov/military.
Below is a list of documents to bring with you to your Form N-400 interview.
1.	 Permanent Resident Card.
2.	 State-Issued Identification. Bring a valid State-issued identification, such as a driver’s license.
3.	 Passports and Travel Documents. Bring valid and expired passports, as well as any travel documents issued by
USCIS.
4.	 Evidence of Your Current Legal Marital Status. Bring the original of all marriage certificates, divorce or
annulment decrees, death certificates, and other official records to confirm your marital history and your current legal
marital status.
5.	 Evidence of the Termination of Your Spouse’s Prior Marriage(s). Bring the original of your current spouse’s
divorce certificate. If your spouse is widowed, bring the original of his or her former spouse’s death certificate. If
neither of these are available, bring any other evidence that indicates the termination of your spouse’s marriage for
consideration.
6.	 Name Change(s). If you have changed your name at any time, bring the document(s) that legally changed your
name(s), such as a marriage certificate, divorce decree, name change petition, or other official record if you ever
changed your name.
7.	 Other Documents. Depending on the circumstances, you should bring certain documents to your interview. You
may also submit copies of these documents with your application. For example:
A.	 Spouse of a U.S. Citizen. Bring the following items to your interview if you are applying for naturalization on
the basis of your marriage to a U.S. citizen:
(1)	 Evidence that your spouse has been a U.S. citizen for at least 3 years at the time you file your Form N-400.
Such evidence may include: a birth certificate (if your spouse never lost U.S. citizenship since birth),
Certificate of Naturalization, Certificate of Citizenship, or Form FS-240 Report of Birth Abroad of a Citizen
of the United States of America;
(2)	 Evidence of the termination of all your prior marriages; and
(3)	 Evidence that you and your spouse have lived in marital union for at least 3 years at the time you file your
Form N-400. Such evidence may include:
(a)	 Joint bank and credit card statements;
(b)	 Leases or mortgages;
(c)	 Birth certificates of children;
(d)	 Insurance policies; and
(e)	 Internal Revenue Service (IRS)-certified copies of the income tax forms that you and your spouse filed for
the past 3 years (or an IRS tax return transcript for the last 3 years).
B.	 Spouse of a U.S. Citizen Who is Regularly Stationed Abroad. Bring evidence demonstrating your U.S. citizen
spouse’s qualifying employment abroad if you are filing under section 319(b). Such evidence may include:
(1)	 The employer’ name and nature of the employer’s business;
(2)	 The nature of the work the U.S. citizen spouse is performing;
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(3)	 Documentation to establish the employing entity is owned in whole or in part by U.S. interests; and
(4)	 Documentation to establish the employing entity is engaged in whole or in part in the development of the
foreign trade and U.S. commerce.
In addition, bring the following:
(1)	 Your U.S. citizen spouse’s travel orders which include your name as a spouse;
(2)	 Documentation to establish your spouse’s employment abroad is scheduled to last for at least 1 year from the
date you filed Form N-400; and
(3)	 A written statement of your intent to reside abroad with your spouse, and to live in the United States
immediately after your spouse’s employment abroad ends.
C.	 Children and Support of Dependents. Bring evidence that all of the children listed on your Form N-400 are
your children. Such evidence may include:
(1)	 Birth certificates for all children you claim, or a court order naming you as the parent; or
(2)	 Final adoption certificates or decrees for all children you have legally adopted.
In addition, if you have dependent children living apart from you, bring evidence that you support each dependent
child and that you have complied with child support obligations. Bring photocopies of the court or government
order and evidence you have complied with the order if a court has ordered you to provide financial support for a
spouse, ex-spouse, or children. Such evidence may include:
(1)	 Cancelled checks or money order receipts;
(2)	 A court or agency document showing child support payments;
(3)	 Evidence of wage garnishments; or
(4)	 A notarized letter from the parent or guardian who cares for your children.
D.	 Tax Returns and Overdue Taxes. Bring photocopies of income tax returns that you filed with the IRS for the
past 5 years, or 3 years if filing for naturalization on the basis of marriage to a U.S. citizen. Tax returns are not
required for every case. However, USCIS strongly encourages you to bring your tax returns; especially if you
are filing based on marriage to a U.S. citizen or have traveled outside the United States for a period that lasted
6 months or more. You can request copies of Federal tax documents at your local IRS office or www.irs.gov.
You may also bring an original IRS tax transcript listing tax information for the past 5 years (3 years if filing on
the basis of marriage to a U.S. citizen). To obtain a free IRS tax transcript, visit www.irs.gov. Select “Tools” and
then select “Order a Return or Account Transcript.” For assistance, you can also call the IRS at 1-800-908-9946.
If you have any Federal, state, or local taxes that are overdue, bring:
(1)	 A signed agreement from the IRS, state, or local tax office showing you have filed a tax return and arranged to
pay the taxes you owe; and
(2)	 Documentation from the IRS, state, or local tax office showing the current status of your repayment program.
E.	 Trips Outside the United States. Bring evidence that you maintained your continuous residence in the United
States if you have taken any trips outside the United States that lasted more than 6 months but less than 1 year.
You may submit documentation which includes, but is not limited to, evidence that during the absence:
(1)	 You did not terminate your employment in the United States or work overseas;
(2)	 Your immediate family remained in the United States; or
(3)	 You retained full access to your place of residence in the United States.
For example:

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(1)	 An IRS tax return transcript or an IRS-certified tax return listing tax information relevant to your absence for
the last 5 years (or 3 years if you are applying on the basis of marriage to a U.S. citizen);
(2)	 Rent or mortgage payments and pay statements;
(3)	 Bank, credit card, and loan statements showing regular transactions;
(4)	 Proof of car registration and insurance;
(5)	 A photocopy of your passport showing entry and exit stamps; or
(6)	 Any other document that shows you have not abandoned your residence in the United States.
F.	 Selective Service Registration. If you are a man between 18 and 26 years of age, provide proof of your
registration with the Selective Service. If you are 26 years of age or older, provide proof that you registered with
the Selective Service when you were required to do so between 18 and 26 years of age.
If you were required to register and did not, provide a typed or printed statement explaining why you did not
register and provide a status information letter from the Selective Service. For more information about Selective
Service registration, or how to get proof that you registered, visit www.sss.gov or call 1-888-655-1825.
G.	 Arrests/Convictions. If you have ever been arrested or detained anywhere in the world, by any law enforcement
officer, for any reason, and no charges were filed, bring:
(1)	 An original or court-certified arrest report; and
(2)	 An official, certified statement from the arresting agency or applicable court confirming that no charges were
filed.
If you have ever been arrested or detained anywhere in the world, by any law enforcement officer, for any reason,
and charges were filed, bring:
(1)	 Certified photocopies of all arrest reports, charging documents, court dispositions, sentencing reports, and any
other relevant documents.
(2)	 You may include any additional evidence in your favor concerning the circumstances of your arrests or
convictions that you would like USCIS to consider.
(3)	 If you were placed on probation, you must provide evidence to show that you completed your probationary
sentence.
If you have ever been convicted or placed in an alternative sentencing program (such as diversion) or
rehabilitative program (such as a drug treatment or community service program), bring:
(1)	 An original or court-certified sentencing record for each incident; and
(2)	 Evidence that you completed your sentence, such as a probation record, parole record, or evidence that you
completed an alternative sentencing program or rehabilitative program. Copies must be certified by the
issuing agency.
If you have ever had any arrest or conviction vacated, set aside, sealed, expunged, or otherwise removed from
your record, bring:
(1)	 An original or court-certified court order vacating, setting aside, sealing, expunging or otherwise removing the
arrest or conviction from your record; or
(2)	 An original statement from the court that no record exists of your arrest or conviction.
NOTE: You must provide the documentation even if someone including a judge, law enforcement officer, or
attorney told you that you no longer have a record or told you that you do not have to disclose the information.
NOTE: You must submit documentation of traffic incidents if:
(1)	 The incident involved alcohol or drugs;

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(2)	 The incident led to an arrest; or
(3)	 The incident seriously injured another person.
You do not need to submit documentation for traffic fines or incidents that did not involve an arrest or did not
involve drugs or alcohol, if the only penalty was a fine of less than $500 or points on your driving record.

What Is the Filing Fee?
The filing fee for Form N-400 is $640. A biometric services fee of $85 is also required for applicants under 75 years of age
when filing Form N-400 regardless of where the applicant lives and whether the applicant is filing from within the United
States or abroad.
NOTE: No filing fee is required for military applicants filing under section 328 or 329 of the INA.
Biometric Services Fee Exceptions
You do not have to pay a biometric services fee if:
1.	 You are 75 years of age or older; or
2.	 You are filing under the military provisions, Section 328 or 329 of the INA.
USCIS cannot accept a biometric services fee if you are not required to pay a biometric services fee.
Rejected Applications
USCIS will reject your Form N-400 if you submit the incorrect fee or an incorrect payment method. USCIS also
will reject your Form N-400 if you include payment for more than what you are required to pay.
In the event USCIS rejects your application, we will return any filing fees with your application.
Use the following guidelines when you are paying for your application. You must:
1.	 Pay for each application using a single payment method (check, money order, or credit card) and not a combination of
methods; and
2.	 Use the same payment method for all applications that are mailed together.
NOTE: You must submit all fees in the exact amounts. The filing fee and biometric services fee are not refundable,
regardless of any action USCIS takes on this application. DO NOT MAIL CASH.
Payments By Check or Money Order
Use the following guidelines when you prepare your checks or money orders for the Form N-400 filing fee and biometric
services fee:
1.	 The checks or money orders must be drawn on a bank or other financial institution located in the United States and
must be payable in U.S. currency; and
2.	 Make the checks or money orders payable to U.S. Department of Homeland Security.
NOTE: Spell out U.S. Department of Homeland Security; do not use the initials “USDHS” or “DHS.”
3.	 If you live outside the United States, contact the nearest U.S. Embassy or U.S. Consulate for instructions on the
method of payment.
Notice to Those Making Payment by Check
If you send us a check, USCIS will convert it into an electronic funds transfer (EFT). This means we will photocopy your
check and use the account information on it to electronically debit your account for the amount of the check. The debit
from your account will usually take 24 hours and your bank will show it on your regular account statement.
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You will not receive your original check back. We will destroy your original check, but will keep a copy of it. If USCIS
cannot process the EFT for technical reasons, you authorize us to process the copy in place of your original check. If your
check is returned as unpayable, USCIS will re-submit the payment to the financial institution one time. If the check is
returned as unpayable a second time, we will reject your application and charge you a returned check fee.
Payments by Credit Card
Use the following guidelines when you complete Form G-1450 to pay your Form N-400 fees by credit card:
1.	 Make sure to complete all three sections of the authorization and sign your authorization; and
NOTE: Failure to provide the requested information may result in USCIS and your financial institution not accepting
the payment. USCIS cannot process credit card payments without an authorized signature.
2.	 Place your Form G-1450 ON TOP of your Form N-400.
Notice to Those Making Payment by Credit Card
If you submit Form G-1450, USCIS will use the information you provide to process a credit card payment through
the Department of Treasury Pay.gov Collections Control Panel (CCP). CCP is a Web-based application that allows
government agencies to process payments by credit or debit cards.
After USCIS processes your Form G-1450, we will destroy your authorization, regardless if USCIS approves or denies
your application. USCIS will reject your application for lack of payment if your credit card is declined. USCIS will not
attempt to process your credit card payment again.
You must use a single credit card to pay all fees on an individual application.
For more information about Form G-1450 and credit card payments for Form N-400, please visit www.uscis.gov/N-400
or review the frequently asked questions, Pay Your N-400 Application Fee with a Credit Card, at
http://www.uscis.gov/forms/fingerprints/pay-your-n-400-application-fee-your-credit-card.
How To Check If the Fees Are Correct
Form N-400 filing fee and biometric services fee are current as of the edition date in the lower left corner of this page.
However, because USCIS fees change periodically, you can verify that the fees are correct by following one of the steps
below.
1.	 Visit the USCIS website at www.uscis.gov, select “FORMS,” and check the appropriate fee; or
2.	 Call the USCIS National Customer Service Center at 1-800-375-5283 and ask for fee information. For TTY (deaf or
hard of hearing) call 1-800-767-1833.
Fee Reduction
You may be eligible for a fee reduction. To qualify for the reduced fee, your household income must be greater than 150
percent and not more than 200 percent of the Federal Poverty Guidelines, at the time of filing, based on your household
size. The Federal Poverty Guidelines are established by the Secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services
annually. To obtain information on the current Federal Poverty Guidelines, visit our website at www.uscis.gov/I-942P
and review Form I-942P, Income Guidelines for Reduced Fees.
If you believe you are eligible for a fee reduction, complete Form I-942, Request for Reduced Fee, and submit it and any
required evidence to support your request with this application. If you are under 75 years of age, there is no reduction
available for the biometric services fee. If your request for reduced fee is approved you will pay $320 plus $85 for a total
payment of $405. You do not have to pay a biometric services fee if you are 75 years of age or older.
NOTE: USCIS cannot accept a biometric services fee if you are not required to pay a biometric services fee. USCIS will
reject your Form N-400 if you submit the incorrect fee or if you attach payment for more than what you are required to
pay. In such a case, USCIS will return any filing fees you submitted with your Form N-400.

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Fee Waiver
You may be eligible for a fee waiver under 8 CFR 103.7(c). If you believe you are eligible for a fee waiver, complete
Form I-912, Request for Fee Waiver (or a written request) and submit it and any required evidence of your inability to pay
the filing fee with this application. You can review the fee waiver guidance at www.uscis.gov/feewaiver.
Re-Filing Form N-400
If USCIS denied your previously filed Form N-400 and you are filing a new Form N-400, you must pay the full amount.
Otherwise, USCIS will not accept your Form N-400. USCIS cannot apply a previously submitted filing fee amount
to a newly filed Form N-400.

Where To File?
See our website at www.uscis.gov/N-400 or call our National Customer Service Center at 1-800-375-5283 for the most
current information about where to file this application. For TTY (deaf or hard of hearing) call 1-800-767-1833.

Address Change
An applicant, petitioner, or requester who is not a U.S. citizen must notify USCIS of his or her new address within 10 days
of moving from his or her previous residence. For information on filing a change of address, go to the USCIS website at
www.uscis.gov/addresschange or contact the USCIS National Customer Service Center at 1-800-375-5283. For TTY
(deaf or hard of hearing) call 1-800-767-1833.
NOTE: Do not submit a change of address request to USCIS Lockbox facilities because these facilities do not process
change of address requests.
CURRENT MEMBERS OF THE U.S. ARMED FORCES
Call the Military Help Line at 1-877-247-4645 if you are transferred to a new duty station after you file your Form N-400,
including if you are deployed overseas or to a vessel.

Processing Information
Any Form N-400 that is not signed or accompanied by the correct filing fee and biometric services fee will be
rejected. Any application that is not completed in accordance with these Instructions, is missing pages, or
otherwise not executed in its entirety, or is not accompanied by the required initial evidence, may also be rejected.
If your Form N-400 is rejected, the application and any fees will be returned to you and you will be notified why
the application is considered deficient. You may correct the deficiency and resubmit Form N-400. An application is
not considered properly filed until accepted by USCIS.
Initial Processing. Once USCIS accepts your application, we will check it for completeness. If you do not completely
fill out this application, you will not establish a basis for your eligibility and USCIS may reject or deny your application.
Requests for More Information. We may request that you provide more information or evidence to support your
application. We may also request that you provide the originals of any copies you submit. If USCIS requests an original
document from you, it will be returned to you after USCIS determines it no longer needs your original.
Requests for Interview. We may request that you appear at a USCIS office for an interview based on your application.
At the time of any interview or other appearance at a USCIS office, we may require that you provide your fingerprints,
photograph, and/or signature to verify your identity and/or update background and security checks.

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Decision. The decision on Form N-400 involves a determination of whether you have established eligibility for the
immigration benefit you are seeking. USCIS will notify you of the decision in writing.

Attorney or Representative
You may be represented, at no expense to the U.S. Government, by an attorney or other duly accredited representative.
Your attorney or representative must submit a Form G-28, Notice of Entry of Appearance as Attorney or Representative,
with your Form N-400. Your attorney or representative may also submit the Form G-28 at the time of your interview.
Form G-28 can be obtained by visiting the USCIS website at www.uscis.gov/G-28, or by calling the USCIS National
Customer Service Center at 1-800-375-5283. For TTY (deaf or hard of hearing) call: 1-800-767-1833.

USCIS Forms and Information
To ensure you are using the latest version of this application, visit the USCIS website at www.uscis.gov where you can
obtain the latest USCIS forms and immigration-related information. If you do not have internet access, you may order
USCIS forms by calling the USCIS Contact Center at 1-800-375-5283. The USCIS Contact Center provides information in
English and Spanish. For TTY (deaf or hard of hearing) call: 1-800-767-1833.
Instead of waiting in line for assistance at your local USCIS office, you can schedule an appointment online at
www.uscis.gov. Select “Schedule an appointment online” and follow the screen prompts to set up your appointment.
Once you finish scheduling an appointment, the system will generate an appointment notice for you.

Penalties
If you knowingly and willfully falsify or conceal a material fact or submit a false document with this Form N-400, USCIS
can deny your Form N-400 and may deny any other immigration benefit. In addition, you may face criminal prosecution
and penalties provided by law.

USCIS Compliance Review and Monitoring
By signing this application, you have stated under penalty of perjury (28 U.S.C. section 1746) that all information and
documentation submitted with this application is complete, true, and correct. You also authorize the release of any
information from your records that USCIS may need to determine your eligibility for the immigration benefit you are
seeking and consent to USCIS verifying such information.
The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has the authority to verify any information you submit to establish
eligibility for the immigration benefit you are seeking at any time. USCIS’ legal authority to verify this information is in
8 U.S.C. sections 1103, 1155, and 1184; and 8 CFR Parts 103, 204, 205, 214, 316, and 336. To ensure compliance with
applicable laws and authorities, USCIS may verify information before or after your case is decided.
Agency verification methods may include, but are not limited to, review of public records and information; contact via
written correspondence, the Internet, facsimile, other electronic transmission, or telephone; unannounced physical site
inspections of residences and locations of employment; and interviews. USCIS will use information obtained through
verification to assess your compliance with the laws and to determine your eligibility for an immigration benefit.
Subject to the restrictions under 8 CFR 103.2(b)(16), USCIS will provide you with an opportunity to address any adverse
or derogatory information that may result from a USCIS compliance review, verification, or site visit after a formal
decision is made on your case or after the agency has initiated an adverse action which may result in revocation or
termination of an approval.

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DHS Privacy Notice
AUTHORITIES: The information requested on this application, and the associated evidence, is collected under the
Immigration and Nationality Act Section 334.
PURPOSE: The primary purpose for providing the requested information on this application is to determine if you have
established eligibility for naturalization. DHS uses the information you provide to grant or deny the immigration benefit
you are seeking.
DISCLOSURE: The information you provide is voluntary. However, failure to provide the requested information,
including your Social Security number (if applicable), and any requested evidence, may delay a final decision or result in
denial of your application.
ROUTINE USES: DHS may share the information you provide on this application, and any additional requested
evidence with other Federal, state, local, and foreign government agencies and authorized organizations. DHS follows
approved routine uses described in the associated published system of records notices [DHS/USCIS/ICE/CBP-001 Alien
File, Index, and National File Tracking System, DHS/USCIS-007 Benefits Information System, and DHS/USCIS-018
Immigration Biometric and Background Check System] and the published privacy impact assessments [DHS/USCIS/
PIA-015 Computer Linked Application Information Management System and DHS/USCIS/PIA-056 USCIS Electronic
Immigration System] which you can find at www.dhs.gov/privacy. DHS may also share this information, as appropriate,
for law enforcement purposes or in the interest of national security.

Paperwork Reduction Act
An agency may not conduct or sponsor information collection, and a person is not required to respond to a collection of
information, unless it displays a currently valid Office of Management and Budget (OMB) control number. The public
reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated at 9 hours and 17 minutes per response, including the time
for reviewing instructions, gathering the required documentation and information, completing the application, preparing
statements, attaching necessary documentation, and submitting the application. The collection of biometrics is estimated
to require 1 hour and 10 minutes. Send comments regarding this burden estimate or any other aspect of this collection of
information, including suggestions for reducing this burden, to: U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, Regulatory
Coordination Division, Office of Policy and Strategy, 20 Massachusetts Ave NW, Washington, DC 20529-2140; OMB
No. 1615-0052. Do not mail your completed Form N-400 to this address.

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