FY 2020 DDRA Application Instructions 508 version-- App renewal_DPE_eqbBSpjmCLEAN

Application Forms and Instructions for the Fulbright-Hays Training Grants: Doctoral Dissertation Research Abroad (CFDA Number 84.022A) and Faculty Research Abroad (CFDA Number 84.019A)

FY 2020 DDRA Application Instructions 508 version-- App renewal_DPE_eqbBSpjmCLEAN

OMB: 1840-0005

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U.S. Department of Education
Washington, D.C. 20202-5335

APPLICATION FOR GRANTS
UNDER THE

Fulbright-Hays Doctoral Dissertation
Research Abroad Fellowship Program

CFDA # 84.022A
PR/
Award # N/A

OMB No. 1840-0005, Expiration Date: 06/30/2020
Closing Date: XX/XX/XXXX 4:30:00 PM

PR/Award # N/A

Table of Contents



Dear Applicant Letter

UNITED STATES DEPARTMEN T OF EDUCATION

OFFICE OF POST SECONDARY EDUCAT ION

Dear Applicant:

Thank you for your interest in applying for a fiscal year 2020 (FY 20) grant award under the Fulbright-Hays Doctoral Dissertation Research Abroad (DDRA) program. This application booklet includes the instructions and forms required to submit a complete application package to the U.S. Department of Education (the Department).

Institutional grants awarded under the DDRA program enable U.S. institutions of higher education (IHEs) to provide fellowships to meritorious doctoral students who propose to conduct dissertation research overseas for a period of 6 - 12 months. To be eligible for DDRA fellowships, doctoral students must be admitted to candidacy in modern foreign languages and area studies programs at U.S. IHEs.

While we encourage you to read the entire application package carefully before preparing your application, this cover letter provides the following highlights for your consideration:

Information about the DDRA program is accessible on the U.S. Department of Education’s Web site at: http://www.ed.gov/programs/iegpsddrap/index.html

The FY 20 Notice Inviting Applications (NIA) published in the Federal Register contains the official requirements for the competition. Applicants should not rely upon any information that is inconsistent with the official NIA document.

The “Competition Highlights” includes the absolute, competitive preference and invitational priorities and provides additional details about the competition.

U.S. IHEs are the legal applicants under the DDRA program. Although the fellowships are subsequently awarded to students, only IHEs are eligible applicants and potential grantees.

The project directors at the applicant IHEs must be registered in the G5 e-Application system in order to submit the institutional applications on behalf of your doctoral students. The registration requirements and procedures are included in the application booklet.

The list of DDRA institutions and program project directors currently registered in the G5 e-Application system is included in the application booklet. If your institution is not listed, or your project director has changed, please contact Dr. Pamela J. Maimer at [email protected] with the new project director’s contact information as soon as possible.

The Department strongly encourages electronic submission of all FY 20 grant applications. You may access the Department’s G5 e-Application system using the portal page at: www.G5.gov

Please be advised that electronic submission of applications via the G5 e-Application system is required unless you qualify for one of the exceptions described in the Notice Inviting Applications. If you think you may need an exception, please review the exception requirements early on your application preparation process.

And finally, applications must be submitted on or before the deadline date. Late applications will not be considered, and applicants cannot submit any changes or additions to their applications after the deadline date. The Department is required to enforce the established deadline to ensure fairness to all applicants.

We look forward to receiving your application and appreciate your efforts to strengthen U.S. capacity in international and foreign language expertise and prepare students with the global competencies needed to meet today’s global challenges.

Sincerely,

/s/

Cheryl E. Gibbs

Senior Director

International and Foreign Language Education














































Public Burden Statement


According to the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, no persons are required to respond to a collection of information unless such collection displays a valid OMB control number.  The valid OMB control number for this information collection is 1840-0005.  Public reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 25 hours per response, including time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing the collection of information.  The obligation to respond to this collection is required to obtain or retain benefit (22 USC §2562(b)).  If you have any comments concerning the accuracy of the time estimate, suggestions for improving this individual collection, or if you have comments or concerns regarding the status of your individual form, application or survey, please contact International and Foreign Language Education/Pamela Maimer at (202) 453-6891 or [email protected] directly.


Competition Highlights

  1. Please note the following program priorities:

    1. Absolute: The Department will only consider applications that meet this priority.

This priority is: A research project that focuses on one or more of the following geographic areas: Africa, East Asia, Southeast Asia and the Pacific Islands, South Asia, the Near East, Central and Eastern Europe and Eurasia, and the Western Hemisphere (excluding the United States and its territories).

    1. Competitive Preference Priority 1: Focus on Less Commonly Taught Languages (2 points). A research project that focuses on any modern foreign language except French, German, or Spanish.

    2. Competitive Preference Priority 2: Thematic Focus on Academic Fields (3 points). A research project conducted in the field of science, technology, engineering, mathematics, computer science, education (comparative or international), international development, political science, public health, or economics.

Note: Applicants that address Competitive Preference Priority 2 must intend to engage in full-time dissertation research abroad in modern foreign languages and area studies with a thematic focus on any one of the academic fields referenced above.

  1. Please note that these priorities are explained in detail in the Federal Register notice.

Potential applicants are strongly encouraged to review the Federal Register notice carefully before preparing an application.

  1. Please note that, although the DDRA program funds student research, the legal applicant is the institution of higher education (IHE), and if a grant is awarded, the institution is the legal grantee. Students are not able to apply for this funding independently. In order to apply for this fellowship program, it is necessary for the student and the institution to coordinate their competition activities and keep each other informed.

  2. Electronic applications must be submitted via the U.S. Department of Educations G5 e-Application system. This system may be accessed at www.G5.gov. Both the student and the IHE must complete their portions of the application correctly and submit separately via the G5 e-Application system.

  3. The application must be received on or before the deadline date and time. Please note that the U.S. Department of Educations grant application deadline is at 4:30:00 pm Washington, DC time. Late applications will not be accepted.

  4. Electronic submission of an application is required unless it qualifies for one of the (rare) exceptions to the electronic submission requirement as outlined in the Federal Register notice.

  5. We recommend that you (1) limit the application narrative to no more than ten (10) and the bibliography to no more than two (2) pages; and (3) use a font that is either 12 point or no smaller than 10 pitch (characters per inch) with one of the following fonts: Times New Roman, Courier, Courier New, or Arial.

  6. Student transcripts must be scanned as one document and uploaded into the student application. Please redact all Personally Identifiable Information (PII) such as, birthdate, SSN, address, etc., from transcripts before uploading.

Applicants are reminded that the Federal Register notice is the official document for application guidelines and that applicants should not rely upon any information that is inconsistent with the guidance contained within it.


Notice Inviting Applications

You will find the official version of the Notice Inviting Applications at: https://federalregister.gov/d/2019-27120 ,

Authorizing Legislation

UNITED STATES CODE

TITLE 22: CHAPTER 33

MUTUAL EDUCATIONAL AND CULTURAL EXCHANGE PROGRAM

Sec. 2451. - Congressional statement of purpose

The purpose of this chapter is to enable the Government of the United States to increase mutual understanding between the people of the United States and the people of other countries by means of educational and cultural exchange; to strengthen the ties which unite us with other nations by demonstrating the educational and cultural interests, developments, and achievements of the people of the United States and other nations, and the contributions being made toward a peaceful and more fruitful life for people throughout the world; to promote international cooperation for educational and cultural advancement; and thus to assist in the development of friendly, sympathetic, and peaceful relations between the United States and the other countries of the world.

Sec. 2452. - Authorization of activities

(a) Grants or contracts for educational or cultural exchanges; participation in international fairs and expositions abroad

The Director of the United States Information Agency is authorized, when he considers that it would strengthen international cooperative relations, to provide, by grant, contract, or otherwise, for -

(1) educational exchanges,

(i) by financing studies, research, instruction, and other educational activities -

(A) of or for American citizens and nationals in foreign countries, and

(B) of or for citizens and nationals of foreign countries in American schools and institutions of learning located in or outside the United States;

and

(ii) by financing visits and interchanges between the United States and other countries of students, trainees, teachers, instructors, and professors;

(2) cultural exchanges, by financing -

(i) visits and interchanges between the United States and other countries of leaders, experts in fields of specialized knowledge or skill, and other influential or distinguished persons;

(ii) tours in countries abroad by creative and performing artists and athletes from the United States, individually and in groups, representing any field of the arts, sports, or any other form of cultural attainment;

(iii) United States representation in international artistic, dramatic, musical, sports, and other cultural festivals, competitions, meetings, and like exhibitions and assemblies;

(iv) participation by groups and individuals from other countries in nonprofit activities in the United States similar to those described in subparagraphs (ii) and (iii) of this paragraph, when the Director of the United States Information Agency determines that such participation is in the national interest. [1]

(3) United States participation in international fairs and expositions abroad, including trade and industrial fairs and other public or private demonstrations of United States economic accomplishments and cultural attainments.

(b) Other exchanges

In furtherance of the purposes of this chapter, the President is further authorized to provide for -

(1) interchanges between the United States and other countries of handicrafts, scientific, technical, and scholarly books, books of literature, periodicals, and Government publications, and the reproduction and translation of such writings, and the preparation, distribution, and interchange of other educational and research materials, including laboratory and technical equipment for education and research;

(2) establishing and operating in the United States and abroad centers for cultural and technical interchanges to promote better relations and understanding between the United States and other nations through cooperative study, training, and research;

(3) assistance in the establishment, expansion, maintenance, and operation of schools and institutions of learning abroad, founded, operated, or sponsored by citizens or nonprofit institutions of the United States, including such schools and institutions serving as demonstration centers for methods and practices employed in the United States;

(4) fostering and supporting American studies in foreign countries through professorships, lectureships, institutes, seminars, and courses in such subjects as American history, government, economics, language and literature, and other subjects related to American civilization and culture, including financing the attendance at such studies by persons from other countries;

(5) promoting and supporting medical, scientific, cultural, and educational research and development;

(6) promoting modern foreign language training and area studies in United States schools, colleges, and universities by supporting visits and study in foreign countries by teachers and prospective teachers in such schools, colleges, and universities for the purpose of improving their skill in languages and their knowledge of the culture of the people of those countries, and by financing visits by teachers from those countries to the United States for the purpose of participating in foreign language training and area studies in United States schools, colleges, and universities;

(7) United States representation at international nongovernmental educational, scientific, and technical meetings;

(8) participation by groups and individuals from other countries in educational, scientific, and technical meetings held under American auspices in or outside the United States;

(9) encouraging independent research into the problems of educational and cultural exchange;

(10) promoting studies, research, instruction, and other educational activities of citizens and nationals of foreign countries in American schools, colleges, and universities located in the United States by making available to citizens and nationals of less developed friendly foreign countries for exchange for currencies of their respective countries (other than excess foreign currencies), at United States embassies, United States dollars in such amounts as may be necessary to enable such foreign citizens or nationals who are coming temporarily to the United States as students, trainees, teachers, instructors, or professors to meet expenses of the kind described in section 2454(e)(1) of this title;

(11) interchanges and visits between the United States and other countries of scientists, scholars, leaders, and other experts in the fields of environmental science and environmental management; and

(12) promoting respect for and guarantees of religious freedom abroad by interchanges and visits between the United States and other nations of religious leaders, scholars, and religious and legal experts in the field of religious freedom.

Doctoral Dissertation Research Abroad Regulations

Title 34: Education

PART 662—FULBRIGHT-HAYS DOCTORAL DISSERTATION RESEARCH ABROAD FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM

Subpart A—General

§662.1 What is the Fulbright-Hays Doctoral Dissertation Research Abroad Fellowship Program?

§662.2 Who is eligible to receive an institutional grant under this program?

§662.3 Who is eligible to receive a fellowship under this program?

§662.4 What is the amount of a fellowship?

§662.5 What is the duration of a fellowship?

§662.6 What regulations apply to this program?

§662.7 What definitions apply to this program?

Subpart B—Applications

§662.10 How does an individual apply for a fellowship?

§662.11 What is the role of the institution in the application process?

Subpart C—Selection of Fellows

§662.20 How is a Fulbright-Hays Doctoral Dissertation Research Abroad Fellow selected?

§662.21 What criteria does the Secretary use to evaluate an application for a fellowship?

§662.22 How does the J. William Fulbright Foreign Scholarship Board select fellows?

Subpart D—Post-award Requirements for Institutions

§662.30 What are an institution's responsibilities after the award of a grant?

Subpart E—Post-award Requirements for Fellows

§662.41 What are a fellow's responsibilities after the award of a fellowship?

§662.42 How may a fellowship be revoked?

Authority: Section 102(b)(6) of the Mutual Educational and Cultural Exchange Act of 1961 (Fulbright-Hays Act), 22 U.S.C. 2452(b)(6), unless otherwise noted.

Source: 63 FR 46361, Aug. 31, 1998, unless otherwise noted.

Subpart A—General

§662.1 What is the Fulbright-Hays Doctoral Dissertation Research Abroad Fellowship Program?

(a) The Fulbright-Hays Doctoral Dissertation Research Abroad Fellowship Program is designed to contribute to the development and improvement of the study of modern foreign languages and area studies in the United States by providing opportunities for scholars to conduct research abroad.

(b) Under the program, the Secretary awards fellowships, through institutions of higher education, to doctoral candidates who propose to conduct dissertation research abroad in modern foreign languages and area studies.

(Authority: 22 U.S.C. 2452(b)(6))

§662.2 Who is eligible to receive an institutional grant under this program?

An institution of higher education is eligible to receive an institutional grant.

(Authority: 22 U.S.C. 2452(b)(6), 2454(e)(1))

§662.3 Who is eligible to receive a fellowship under this program?

An individual is eligible to receive a fellowship if the individual—

(a)(1) Is a citizen or national of the United States; or

(2) Is a permanent resident of the United States;

(b)(1) Is a graduate student in good standing at an institution of higher education; and

(2) When the fellowship period begins, is admitted to candidacy in a doctoral degree program in modern foreign languages and area studies at that institution;

(c) Is planning a teaching career in the United States upon completion of his or her doctoral program; and

(d) Possesses sufficient foreign language skills to carry out the dissertation research project.

(Authority: 22 U.S.C. 2452(b)(6), 2454(e)(1))

§662.4 What is the amount of a fellowship?

(a) The Secretary pays—

(1) Travel expenses to and from the residence of the fellow and the country or countries of research;

(2) A maintenance stipend for the fellow and his or her dependents related to cost of living in the host country or countries;

(3) An allowance for research-related expenses overseas, such as books, copying, tuition and affiliation fees, local travel, and other incidental expenses; and

(4) Health and accident insurance premiums.

(b) In addition, the Secretary may pay—

(1) Emergency medical expenses not covered by health and accident insurance; and

(2) The costs of preparing and transporting the remains of a fellow or dependent who dies during the term of the fellowship to his or her former home.

(c) The Secretary announces the amount of benefits expected to be available in an application notice published in the Federal Register.

(Authority: 22 U.S.C. 2452(b)(6), 2454(e) (1) and (2))

§662.5 What is the duration of a fellowship?

(a) A fellowship is for a period of not fewer than six nor more than twelve months.

(b) A fellowship may not be renewed.

(Authority: 22 U.S.C. 2452(b)(6))

§662.6 What regulations apply to this program?

The following regulations apply to this program:

(a) The regulations in this part 662; and

(b) The Education Department General Administrative Regulations (EDGAR) (34 CFR parts 75, 77, 81, 82, and 86).

(c)(1) 2 CFR part 180 (OMB Guidelines to Agencies on Governmentwide Debarment and Suspension (Nonprocurement)), as adopted at 2 CFR part 3485; and

(2) 2 CFR part 200 (Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles, and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards), as adopted at 2 CFR part 3474.

(Authority: 22 U.S.C. 2452(b)(6))

[63 FR 46361, Aug. 31, 1998, as amended at 79 FR 76104, Dec. 19, 2014]

§662.7 What definitions apply to this program?

(a) Definitions of the following terms as used in this part are contained in 2 CFR part 200, subpart A, or 34 CFR part 77:

Applicant

Application

Fiscal year

Grant

Award

Secretary

EDGAR

(b) The definition of institution of higher education as used in this part is contained in 34 CFR 600.4.

(c) The following definitions of other terms used in this part apply to this program:

Area studies means a program of comprehensive study of the aspects of a society or societies, including the study of their geography, history, culture, economy, politics, international relations, and languages.

Binational commission means an educational and cultural commission established, through an agreement between the United States and either a foreign government or an international organization, to carry out functions in connection with the program covered by this part.

Dependent means any of the following individuals who accompany the recipient of a fellowship under this program to his or her training site for the entire fellowship period if the individual receives more than 50 percent of his or her support from the recipient during the fellowship period:

(1) The recipient's spouse.

(2) The recipient's or spouse's children who are unmarried and under age 21.

J. William Fulbright Foreign Scholarship Board means the presidentially-appointed board that is responsible for supervision of the program covered by this part.

(Authority: 22 U.S.C. 2452(b)(6), 2456)

[63 FR 46361, Aug. 31, 1998, as amended at 79 FR 76104, Dec. 19, 2014]

Subpart B—Applications

§662.10 How does an individual apply for a fellowship?

(a) An individual applies for a fellowship by submitting an application to the Secretary through the institution of higher education in which the individual is enrolled.

(b) The applicant shall provide sufficient information concerning his or her personal and academic background and proposed research project to enable the Secretary to determine whether the applicant—

(1) Is eligible to receive a fellowship under §662.3; and

(2) Should be selected to receive a fellowship under subparts C and D of this part.

(Authority: 22 U.S.C. 2452(b)(6))

§662.11 What is the role of the institution in the application process?

An institution of higher education that participates in this program is responsible for—

(a) Making fellowship application materials available to its students;

(b) Accepting and screening applications in accordance with its own technical and academic criteria; and

(c) Forwarding screened applications to the Secretary and requesting an institutional grant.

(Authority: 22 U.S.C. 2452(b)(6), 2454(e)(1))

Subpart C—Selection of Fellows

§662.20 How is a Fulbright-Hays Doctoral Dissertation Research Abroad Fellow selected?

(a) The Secretary considers applications for fellowships under this program that have been screened and submitted by eligible institutions. The Secretary evaluates these applications on the basis of the criteria in §662.21.

(b) The Secretary does not consider applications to carry out research in a country in which the United States has no diplomatic representation.

(c) In evaluating applications, the Secretary obtains the advice of panels of United States academic specialists in modern foreign languages and area studies.

(d) The Secretary gives preference to applicants who have served in the armed services of the United States if their applications are equivalent to those of other applicants on the basis of the criteria in §662.21.

(e) The Secretary considers information on budget, political sensitivity, and feasibility from binational commissions or United States diplomatic missions, or both, in the proposed country or countries of research.

(f) The Secretary presents recommendations for recipients of fellowships to the J. William Fulbright Foreign Scholarship Board, which reviews the recommendations and approves recipients.

(Authority: 22 U.S.C. 2452(b)(6), 2456)

§662.21 What criteria does the Secretary use to evaluate an application for a fellowship?

(a) General. The Secretary evaluates an application for a fellowship on the basis of the criteria in this section. The Secretary informs applicants of the maximum possible score for each criterion in the application package or in a notice published in the Federal Register.

(b) Quality of proposed project. The Secretary reviews each application to determine the quality of the research project proposed by the applicant. The Secretary considers—

(1) The statement of the major hypotheses to be tested or questions to be examined, and the description and justification of the research methods to be used;

(2) The relationship of the research to the literature on the topic and to major theoretical issues in the field, and the project's originality and importance in terms of the concerns of the discipline;

(3) The preliminary research already completed in the United States and overseas or plans for such research prior to going overseas, and the kinds, quality and availability of data for the research in the host country or countries;

(4) The justification for overseas field research and preparations to establish appropriate and sufficient research contacts and affiliations abroad;

(5) The applicant's plans to share the results of the research in progress and a copy of the dissertation with scholars and officials of the host country or countries; and

(6) The guidance and supervision of the dissertation advisor or committee at all stages of the project, including guidance in developing the project, understanding research conditions abroad, and acquainting the applicant with research in the field.

(c) Qualifications of the applicant. The Secretary reviews each application to determine the qualifications of the applicant. The Secretary considers—

(1) The overall strength of the applicant's graduate academic record;

(2) The extent to which the applicant's academic record demonstrates strength in area studies relevant to the proposed project;

(3) The applicant's proficiency in one or more of the languages (other than English and the applicant's native language) of the country or countries of research, and the specific measures to be taken to overcome any anticipated language barriers; and

(4) The applicant's ability to conduct research in a foreign cultural context, as evidenced by the applicant's references or previous overseas experience, or both.

(d) Priorities. (1) The Secretary determines the extent to which the application responds to any priority that the Secretary establishes for the selection of fellows in any fiscal year. The Secretary announces any priorities in an application notice published in the Federal Register.

(2) Priorities may relate to certain world areas, countries, academic disciplines, languages, topics, or combinations of any of these categories. For example, the Secretary may establish a priority for—

(i) A specific geographic area or country, such as the Caribbean or Poland;

(ii) An academic discipline, such as economics or political science;

(iii) A language, such as Tajik or Indonesian; or

(iv) A topic, such as public health issues or the environment.

(Approved by the Office of Management and Budget under control number 1840-0005)

(Authority: 22 U.S.C. 2452(b)(6), 2456(a)(2))

[63 FR 46361, Aug. 31, 1998, as amended at 70 FR 13376, Mar. 21, 2005]

§662.22 How does the J. William Fulbright Foreign Scholarship Board select fellows?

(a) The J. William Fulbright Foreign Scholarship Board selects fellows on the basis of the Secretary's recommendations and the information described in §662.20(e) from binational commissions or United States diplomatic missions.

(b) No applicant for a fellowship may be awarded more than one graduate fellowship under the Fulbright-Hays Act from appropriations for a given fiscal year.

(Authority: 22 U.S.C. 2452(b)(6), 2456(a)(1))

Subpart D—Post-award Requirements for Institutions

§662.30 What are an institution's responsibilities after the award of a grant?

(a) An institution to which the Secretary awards a grant under this part is responsible for administering the grant in accordance with the regulations described in §662.6.

(b) The institution is responsible for processing individual applications for fellowships in accordance with procedures described in §662.11.

(c) The institution is responsible for disbursing funds in accordance with procedures described in §662.4.

(d) The Secretary awards the institution an administrative allowance of $100 for each fellowship listed in the grant award document.

(Authority: 22 U.S.C. 2452(b)(6), 2454(e)(1))

Subpart E—Post-award Requirements for Fellows

§662.41 What are a fellow's responsibilities after the award of a fellowship?

As a condition of retaining a fellowship, a fellow shall—

(a) Maintain satisfactory progress in the conduct of his or her research;

(b) Devote full time to research on the approved topic;

(c) Not engage in unauthorized income-producing activities during the period of the fellowship; and

(d) Remain a student in good standing with the grantee institution during the period of the fellowship.

(Authority: 22 U.S.C. 2452(b)(6))

§662.42 How may a fellowship be revoked?

(a) The fellowship may be revoked only by the J. William Fulbright Foreign Scholarship Board upon the recommendation of the Secretary.

(b) The Secretary may recommend a revocation of a fellowship on the basis of—

(1) The fellow's failure to meet any of the conditions in §662.41; or

(2) Any violation of the standards of conduct adopted by the J. William Fulbright Foreign Scholarship Board.

(Authority: 22 U.S.C. 2452(b)(6), 2456, and Policy Statements of the J. William Fulbright Foreign Scholarship Board, 1990)

Government Performance and Results Act

What is GPRA?

The Government Performance and Results Act of 1993 (GPRA) requires all federal agencies to manage their activities with attention to the consequences of those activities. Each agency is to clearly state what it intends to accomplish, identify the resources required, and periodically report their progress to Congress. In so doing, it is expected that the GPRA will contribute to improvements in accountability for the expenditures of public funds, improve Congressional decision-making through more objective information on the effectiveness of federal programs, and promote a new government focus on results, service delivery, and customer satisfaction.

How has the Department of Education Responded to the GPRA Requirements?

As required by GPRA, the Department of Education has prepared a strategic plan for 2014-2018. This plan reflects the Departments priorities and integrates them with its mission and program authorities and describes how the Department will work to improve education for all children and adults in the U.S. The 2014-2018 plan includes the following six goals:

Goal 1: Increase college access, affordability, quality, and completion by improving postsecondary education and lifelong learning opportunities for youth and adults

Goal 2: Improve the elementary and secondary systems ability to consistently deliver excellent instruction aligned with rigorous academic standards while providing effective support services to close achievement and opportunity gaps, and ensure all students graduate high school college- and career-ready

Goal 3: Improve the health, social-emotional, and cognitive outcomes for all children from birth through third grade, so that all children, particularly those with high needs, are on track for graduating from high school college- and career-ready

Goal 4: Increase educational opportunities for and reduce discrimination against underserved students so that all students are well-positioned to succeed

Goal 5: Enhance the education systems ability to continuously improve through better and more widespread use of data, research, and evaluation, evidence, transparency, innovation, and technology

Goal 6: Improve the organizational capacities of the Department to implement its strategic plan

What are the Performance Indicators for the International Education Programs?

The objective of the DDRA program is to contribute to the development and improvement of the study of modern foreign languages and area studies in the United States by providing opportunities for scholars to conduct research abroad for periods of 6 to 12 months.

The Department has developed (and OMB has approved) the following GPRA measures to evaluate the overall success of this IFLE grant program:

DDRA GPRA Measure 1: Percentage of DDRA fellows who increased their foreign language scores in speaking, reading, and/or writing by at least one proficiency level.

DDRA GPRA Measure 2: Percentage of DDRA fellows who complete their degree in their program of study within four years of receipt of the fellowship.

DDRA GPRA Measure 3: Percentage of DDRA fellows who found employment that utilized their language and area studies skills within eight years of receiving their award.

DDRA GPRA Measure 4: The cost per DDRA fellow who found employment that utilized their language and area studies skills within eight years. *

*(The US/ED IFLE office will be able to calculate Measure 4 (efficiency measure) based on future answers to DDRA GPRA Measure 3.)

Successful applicants (later grantees) will be required to collect data on DDRA GPRA Measures 1 through 3 and report those data to US/ED in their interim and final performance reports.

Guidance for Developing an Evaluation Plan

OVERVIEW OF GPRA MEASURES, PROGRAM EVALUATION, AND PROJECT EVALUATION

The U.S. Congress passed the Government Performance and Results Act (GPRA) of 1993 and the GPRA Modernization Act of 2010 to assess and improve federally funded programs. GPRA requires that federal agencies document the achievements of grant-funded programs. Specifically, GPRA requires federal agencies, such as the U.S. Department of Education, to develop and report quantifiable annual and long-term measures to Congress. GPRA stipulates that these measures be limited in number, be specific, and have baselines and targets that are ambitious, yet achievable. Performance reporting occurs at the program level, meaning that the

U.S. Department of Education (ED) aggregates data from all International and Foreign Language Education (IFLE) grantees and reports on measures of the IFLE program overall. ED’s challenge is to articulate program-level measures that are relevant to several grant programs and that capture the achievements of many disparate grantees. ED’s Budget Service and the U.S. Office of Management and Budget (OMB) review and approve IFLE’s GPRA measures to make sure that the measures reflect the programs’ overall goals. Therefore, once approved, GPRA measures remain relatively constant over time.

IFLE must collect data from grantees to respond to the GPRA measures for each program. ED IFLE aggregates the GPRA information reported by all grantees to report the impact of each grant program (e.g., the Center for International Business and Education - CIBE grant program as a whole) to Congress and other interested stakeholders. This information contributes to ED/IFLEs overall evaluation of each grant program.

By contrast, individual project measures yield specific information that enables grantees to make mid-course corrections in implementing their proposed projects, if necessary. Project-specific evaluation measures are tailored by project leadership to that projects goals. Project leadership may establish specific measures to garner internal institutional support, attract and train staff, attract and retain students, and sustain the projects effort beyond the grant period.

Project-specific measures will vary greatly between institutions that have received IFLE grants before and novice applicant institutions. For example, an institution that is a current recipient of a CIBE grant or that has received CIBE grants in the past might offer many Study Abroad programs. Based on feedback from its prior project evaluations, that institution might propose a new Study Abroad program in a world region not previously served or expand the duration of an existing program. In this case, a project-specific measure might be the number of students enrolled in the new program. However, a first-time CIBE applicant might propose to offer a few short-term Study Abroad summer programs in its first year as part of a multi-year plan that includes expanding the world regions served over time. In this case, a project-specific measure might be the number of faculty qualified to lead a summer program to specific world regions.

THE GOVERNMENT PERFORMANCE AND RESULTS ACT OF 1993 (GPRA) AND THE GPRA MODERNIZATION ACT OF 2010 (GPRAMA)

GPRA and GPRAMA are intended to improve accountability for the expenditure of public funds, enhance congressional decision-making by providing Congress with objective information on the effectiveness of federal programs, and promoting federal programs’ results, delivery of services, and customers’ satisfaction. Accordingly, GPRA and the GPRAMA mandate that Federal agencies, including ED, submit three major products to Congress: multi-year strategic plans, annual plans, and annual reports. To comply with GPRA and GPRAMA, ED must state clearly in these products what it intends to accomplish, identify the resources required, and report on its progress annually to Congress.

HOW HAS THE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION RESPONDED TO THE GPRA REQUIREMENTS?

As required by GPRA, ED has developed a strategic plan that reflects its organizational priorities and also integrates IFLEs mission and program authorities. ED’s stated goal for IFLE is to meet the nations security and economic needs through the development and maintenance of a national capacity in foreign languages, and area and international studies.”

The Title VI international education programs’ overarching goals are to maintain a U.S. higher education system with the capacity to produce experts in less commonly taught languages and area studies who are capable of contributing to the needs of U.S. government, academic, and business institutions. The Fulbright-Hays programs provide opportunities for U.S. educators and postsecondary students to advance their studies of foreign languages, to create and improve curriculum, or to conduct learning and research activities in host country settings. Each IFLE grant program addresses a specific objective related to the overarching goal. The next section of this document provides program-specific guidance to applicants on selecting appropriate performance and evaluation measures.

IFLE GRANT PROJECT EVALUATION

A strong project proposal by an applicant for an IFLE grant includes a well-designed evaluation plan that is based on clearly stated goals and objectives. The evaluation plan must address all IFLE GPRA measures, as well as include project-specific measures that are tied to the projects goals and objectives. The evaluation plan also must identify how each of the specific objectives will be achieved and establish the quantitative and qualitative measures that will be used to demonstrate the successful implementation of the proposed project. The Performance-Measure Form (PMF) serves as a guide for applicants to plan and articulate key aspects of a well-designed evaluation plan.

IFLE offers applicant institutions the following suggestions to consider in developing the Impact and Evaluation section of the grant application.

DEVELOPING AN EVALUATION PLAN

Working with an Independent Project Evaluator

Please note that an independent project evaluator may not be required for every IFLE grant program. Applicants and grantees should consult with their IFLE program officer and refer to program-specific materials for guidance.

The independent project evaluator should be involved in the project throughout the entire grant cycle from the proposal development phase through the projects funding and implementation to ensure that a well-designed evaluation plan is developed and implemented. The independent project evaluator works with key project personnel to draft measurable objectives, identify appropriate progress indicators and benchmarks, and to formalize the data collection, calculation, and analytical methodologies. The primary role of the independent project evaluator is to provide technical support and expertise to the project in order to best demonstrate its progress toward achieving stated goals and objectives. The independent project evaluator may also provide support and guidance for the development of a dissemination plan to publicize the project results to internal and external entities.

A grant applicant may wish to collaborate with other projects on a given campus to pool resources and share the cost of a professional evaluator. The guidance provided in this document is intended to help maximize evaluation resources by streamlining an evaluation process and by supporting collaboration between key project personnel and an independent evaluator. Very small projects may have very limited funds available to compensate an evaluator. In such cases, limited resources are best expended on working with an evaluator at the projects start, as opposed to its later stages.

To ensure both the quality and the credibility of the evaluation, it should be conducted by a qualified evaluator with appropriate expertise and training. The evaluator should be independent, whether the evaluator is internal or external to the grant project. The applicant should provide a plan to ensure that the evaluator maintains sufficient independence from the project team, thus avoiding any potential or perceived conflict of interest.

Developing Clear Goals and Objectives

A well-designed evaluation plan includes clearly articulated goals, measurable objectives, and a way to collect concrete data to substantiate the projects progress toward achieving its goals. The evaluation plan should be limited to a few clear and specific objectives that are linked directly to the proposed goals of the project and that can be measured. The applicant/grantee should consider the following when developing measurable objectives and planning for data collection:

      1. What will indicate or demonstrate that the project is meeting its goals? Describe the expected measurable outcomes.

      2. What types and sources of data will best demonstrate that the project is achieving, or will achieve, its objectives? Identify the data and its sources that can serve as indicators or benchmarks that the project is meeting, or will meet, the intended outcomes.

      3. How will the data be collected? Describe access and frequency.

      4. How will the data be analyzed and reported? Describe the methodology and key personnel responsible.

      5. Will the results demonstrate the projects proposed outcome and impact (e.g., an increase in qualified language instructors, higher graduation rate in international studies, better employment rate of program graduates, etc.)? Describe how the results may demonstrate short-term and long-term outcomes and impact.

Examples of possible project-specific quantitative objectives include:

  • Increase the number of students completing advanced courses in priority languages;

  • Increase the number of students in business, health, or science majors graduating with foreign language skills;

  • Increase the number of study abroad opportunities for students on campus; or,

  • Increase the number of certificates and degrees conferred in targeted programs of study.

Examples of possible project-specific qualitative objectives include:

  • Improve employment opportunities for students who possess advanced language skills and international experience;

  • Strengthen collaboration between foreign language departments, international education, and other disciplines; or,

  • Improve quality of assessment tools for priority and/or less-commonly-taught languages.

Examples of specific activities that may support project objectives include:

  • Recruit and hire qualified priority language faculty; or,

  • Create or increase professional development and training sessions for faculty.

Progress indicators that relate to the quantitative and qualitative examples cited in the above sections include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Increase in the number of new faculty positions in priority and/or less-commonly-taught languages, area studies courses, or interdisciplinary courses that are institutionalized after grant support has ended;

  • Increase in the number and type of courses developed, piloted, and subsequently submitted to the institutions review board for inclusion in the college catalog for the upcoming academic year.

Developing Evaluation Questions

An applicant should formulate evaluation questions that interest all stakeholders and audiences related to the proposed project and align the questions with appropriate information gathering techniques.

  1. Who/what will change?

  2. When will the change(s) take place?

  3. How much change is expected?

  4. How will change be measured, recorded, or documented?

Planning Data Collection and Analysis

In order to show change, baseline data must be included in the final evaluation plan and submitted to the program office, once the grant is awarded. Applicants should determine if baseline data already exist and where to find them. Data collection instruments that are not readily available need to be developed. Data collection instruments may include surveys, standardized tests, exams, focus groups, and topic guides. Institutions may have additional instruments that are specific to the proposed project. The final evaluation plan must specify the types and sources of data that will be collected and describe how the data will be collected, including access and frequency. The plan must also describe how the data will be compiled, analyzed, and reported, as well as the methodology that will be used and key personnel responsible for these tasks. The institutions should work with evaluation specialists to develop a detailed analysis plan to analyze the data and interpret results. In addition, the evaluation plan should include a timeline to delineate tasks and specify when and how progress benchmarks or indicators will be met. The timeline will help projects to stay on track toward achieving their goals.

Guidelines for Applicant Institutions

There are two parts to this application. The first part contains information and forms for the institution of higher education. The second part contains instructions and forms for the student applicants.

Although the DDRA program funds student research, the legal applicant is the institution, and if a grant is awarded, the institution is the legal grantee. Students are not able to apply for this funding independently. In order to apply for this program, it is necessary for the student and the institution to coordinate their activities and keep each other informed.

Applications must be submitted electronically via the U.S. Department of Education’s (US/ED) G5 e- Application system. This system may be accessed at www.g5.gov. Both the student and the institution must complete their portions of the application correctly and submit via G5 e-Application. Students and Project Directors should read through the following guidelines and the information in this application package carefully, especially the Federal Register notice, and follow the instructions in order to submit a timely and complete application to US/ED.

The institution must appoint a Project Director. The Project Director is the individual at the institution who will actually submit the application to US/ED, and who will administer the grant and disburse funds, should any students at the university receive funding. This individual is usually someone in the office of the Dean of Graduate Studies or Student Affairs. It is not recommended that a student’s advisor serve as the Project Director. There can be only one Project Director at an institution, and that person administers the grant and serves as the point of contact for all of that institution’s fellows, regardless of research topic or discipline.

Responsibilities of the Institution's Project Director

The Project Director at the applying institution of higher education is responsible for:

a) Registering as the Project Director for his/her university in the G5 e-Application system. In order to obtain a password and login information, he/she must first send his/her contact information to ddra@ed.gov by the date specified in the Federal Register notice. If he/she fails to do this, he/she may not be able to access G5 e-Application and will not be able to transmit his/her institution’s application package.

  1. Completing OPE- Fulbright-Hays DDRA Form Item #022:

    1. Screen individual student applications in accordance with the institution's own technical and academic criteria and the program's eligibility requirements;

    2. Indicate, for each student, whether Human Subjects Research Clearance (IRB) will be required by checking Yes” or No”. Be sure to include the required narrative for each project involving human subjects as indicated in question #3 on the ED Supplemental

Information for SF 424 form.

  1. Transmitting in a single submission all recommended individual Doctoral Dissertation Research Abroad student applications. One each of the following forms should be included for each student applicant: Application for Federal Assistance (SF 424), the ED Supplemental

Information for SF 424, the Assurances -- Non-Construction Programs (ED Form 424B) and the Certification Regarding Lobbying; Debarment, Suspension, and Other Responsibility Matters; and Drug-Free Workplace Requirements to the U.S./ED in accordance with the guidelines published in the Federal Register for new awards and contained in the transmittal instructions.

  1. Announcing the preliminary results of the competition to individual applicants (i.e., candidate status, alternate status, non-selection). An executed copy of the Grant Award Notification between the US/ED and the institution of higher education listing fellowship holders and award benefits will constitute the official announcement of the award. We estimate the announcements will be made in September 2020.

  2. Administering the grant and disbursing funds.

Instructions for Assembly, Duplication and Transmission

A complete institutional application to the DDRA Program is the sum of all completed student applications, plus the--

  • Application for Federal Assistance (SF 424), the ED Supplement to the 424,

  • Assurances -- Non-Construction Programs (SF 424B);

  • Certification Regarding Lobbying; Debarment, Suspension and Other Responsibility Matters;

  • Drug-Free Workplace Requirements; and

  • Disclosure of Lobbying Activities (if applicable).

Institutional Project Directors must submit the application to the US/ED via G5 e-Application, in accordance with the guidelines published in the Federal Register. Failure to meet the deadline published in the Federal Register will mean rejection of the application without consideration. There is no appeal of this requirement.

Supplemental Instructions for the Application for Federal Assistance (SF 424)

The Federal forms that accompany this electronic submission MUST be filled out on paper and faxed to US/ED. Within three business days of the closing date, please print and complete the forms listed below, sign them, and email them to [email protected].

The instructions for the items given below are to be used in conjunction with the general instructions contained in this application packet.

Item 1. Select Application.

Item 2. Select New. Items 3 – 5a. Enter N/A. Item 5b. Enter 84.022A

Item 6. Enter date received by state (if appropriate). Otherwise list date of submission.

Item 7. Enter N/A

Item 8. A. Enter the legal name of the institution of higher education.

    1. Enter the tax identification number as assigned by the Internal Revenue Service.

    2. Provide the institution’s Data Universal Numbering System (D-U-N-S) number. You can obtain your D-U-N-S number at no charge by calling 1-866-705-5711 or by completing a D-U-N-S Number Request Form. The form can be obtained via the Internet at the following URL: http://www.dnb.com

    3. Enter the address of the institution of higher education.

    4. Enter the organizational unit that will undertake the funding activity

    5. Enter the name of the Project Director. The Project Director should be the institution of higher education's representative who will be responsible for the daily administration of the program while the researcher is overseas. Enter the title, organizational affiliation, telephone and fax numbers and e-mail address of the Project Director.

Item 9. Select H Public/State Controlled IHE or O Private IHE.

Item 10. Enter US Department of Education.

Item 11. Enter 84.022A, Fulbright-Hays Doctoral Dissertation Research Abroad Program.

Item 12. Enter ED-GRANTS-121719-002, Fulbright-Hays Doctoral Dissertation Research Abroad Program.

Item 13. Enter N/A.

Item 14. Enter N/A.

Item 15. Enter Fulbright-Hays Doctoral Dissertation Research Abroad Program.

Item 16. A. Enter the congressional district for the applicant institution;

B. Enter N/A.

Item 17. A. Enter 10/1/2020.

B. Enter 03/31/2022.

Item 18. Enter the total amount requested (the sum of all the student applicants’ requests).

Item 19. Check C. Program is not covered by E.O. 12372.

Item 20. Self-explanatory.

Item 21. Self-explanatory to be completed by institution’s Authorized Representative.

Item 22. This item will populate automatically when student applicants submit their applications in G5 e-Application. To view a students application, click on that student’s name.

Frequently Asked Questions for Project Directors

Q1. Who is the Project Director?

A1. The Project Director (PD) is the individual at the institution who will actually submit the application to the U.S. Department of Education (US/ED). This individual will administer the grant and disburse funds, should any students at the university receive the DDRA fellowship. This individual is usually someone in the office of the Dean of Graduate Studies or Student Affairs. It is not recommended that a students advisor serve as the Project Director. There can be only one Project Director at an institution to serve as the point of contact for all of that institutions fellows, regardless of research topic or discipline.

Q2. How does a new Project Director register in the G5 e-Application system?

A2. The registration process for the Project Director involves three (3) steps. First, check the enclosed list of previously registered Project Directors to see if it includes one’s institution. If there is no listing, or the listed information needs to be changed, please request access to the DDRA Project Director screens from the US/ED program officer at ddra@ed.gov. Second, request access to the G5 e-Application system by submitting the Project Director’s name, institution, and email address to the program officer at ddra@ed.gov by the date specified in the published Notice Inviting Applications. Third, register in the G5 e-Application system at www.G5.gov once the US/ED program officer informs the Project Director that access has been granted. Current PDs do not need to register again. If you have forgotten your G5 log in information, please use the link on the website at www.G5.gov.

Q3. How many sections are there to the application, and who completes which section?

A3. There are two major sections to the G5 e-application. The first section contains information and forms for the IHE. The second section contains instructions and forms for the student applicants. Upon completion of the individual component of the application, the student submits all portions of the application (narrative, curriculum vitae, individual budget, notifications to his/her references, transcripts, etc.) to the Project Director. The Project Director is responsible for reviewing all individual student applications from his/her institution and submitting them in a single student section, along with the required institutional components, to the US/ED. Only the Project Director can submit an application to US/ED.

Q4. How does the Project Director review and approve the student applications for submission to US/ED?

A4. The Project Director is able to review only applications that have been submitted to him/her by individual student applicants enrolled at his/her institution. The Project Director should consult Item 22 on Application for Federal Assistance (SF 424) to see which students have submitted applications. To review an individual application, the Project Director should click on the students name. This will link the Project Director to that individuals application. After the review of all individual applications for accuracy and eligibility has been completed, the Project Director indicates his/her approval of each application by ensuring that the acceptance box next to each name is checked. Only Project Director-approved applications are included in the institutional submission to US/ED.

Q5. How are the students Graduate and Language Reference Forms submitted?

A5: The student applicant will submit, via the G5 e-Application system, the referees’ names and email addresses. The referees will then receive the emails, which are automatically generated from the G5 e-Application system, with directions for completing and returning the reference forms. The emails will contain links to the forms and Personal Identify Numbers (PINs) for the referees. The referees must click on the links and provide the PINs in order to be linked to the students reference forms. Once the forms are completed, the referees click the submit buttons. After the referees hit the submit buttons, the forms have been submitted to the Project Director. Both the student and the Project Director can monitor the submission of, but cannot review, the reference forms. Students and Project Directors can monitor the submission of the reference forms by reviewing the form status. The status will state “complete once the referees have completed and submitted their references. All referee forms must be submitted before the Project Director submits the institutional application to US/ED. It would be helpful if the referee sent a copy of the reference and form to the project director as a precaution. We suggest that the Project Director set internal deadlines for the submission of references and remind students to inform their referees of this deadline.

Q6. How does the student applicant upload their transcripts?

A6. Student applicants submit all transcripts electronically, through the G5 e-application. Before a student uploads the document, please remove any personally identifiable information (PII) from any transcripts (i.e. birthdate, social security number, address). Students scan all transcripts and upload in the application as a single document. Transcripts obtained electronically must have all security features disabled. If the security features are not disabled, US/ED will not have access to review the document and it will not be included in the review.

Q7. Should transcripts be the “official” transcript or are unofficial transcripts allowed?

A7. It is recommended that official transcripts are submitted whenever possible. Unofficial transcripts should contain the students name, University ID number, and institution on the document.

Q8. Should student applicants include their undergraduate transcripts?

A8. Yes, undergraduate transcripts should be included if they help to demonstrate the applicants language and area studies academic background.

Q9. Can the Project Director schedule his/her own institutional deadline to meet the closing date published in the Federal Register?

A9. Yes. The Project Director should set an institutional deadline for students and referees so there is time to review the individual application material, solve technical problems, and submit a complete institutional application before the official program deadline as specified in the Federal Register.

Q10. If a Project Director has access to the DDRA Program screens, does the Project Director also have access to the Faculty Research Abroad (FRA) Program and other IFLE program screens?

A10. No. Each International Foreign Language Education (IFLE) program is separate and distinct in the G5 e-Application. The Project Director must register for each program in accordance with the instructions outlined in the Federal Register. If a Project Director is considering submitting an application for other programs, IFLE strongly suggests that potential Project Directors registers in the e-Application system as soon as possible.

Q11. What signatures are required for the G5 e-Application?

A11. The Project Director is responsible for submitting all documents electronically, including the Application for Federal Assistance (SF 424), and all necessary assurances and certifications. Within three days after submitting the electronic application, the Project Director MUST obtain the institutions Authorizing Representative’s signature on the SF 424 and fax it to the Application Control Center. The applications identifier number (P022A2000XX) must be noted in the upper right hand corner of the faxed signature page of the SF 424. US/ED may request original signatures on other forms at a later date.

Q12. What happens after a Project Director submits the G5 e-Application?

A12. After the Project Director submits the application, the entire application (both the student and institutional sections) is sent electronically to US/ED. The Project Director will receive a confirmation email. This message will include the applications identifier number (P022A2000XX). The Project Director knows that the submission is successfully transmitted once the Project Director receives the email confirmation.

Q13. When does the Project Director officially submit the e-Application?

A13. The Project Director must submit the e-Application BEFORE 4:30:00 pm Washington, DC time on the published closing date. The Project Director should first ensure that 1) all institutional and individual student applications including graduate and foreign language references are completed and included in the application; 3) each individual student application has been approved by the checked box next to the applicants name on Item 22” in the Application for Federal Assistance (SF 424).

Q14. When is the Project Director notified about the status of the student applications?

A14. The review process for DDRA Program applications is lengthy and multi-faceted, so announcement times may vary. Institutional status will be announced not later than September 30, 2020. It is the responsibility of the institution to inform students of their status. US/ED does not inform students directly.

Q15. What is the next step if an institution is awarded a DDRA grant?

A15. If an institution receives a DDRA grant, the Project Director will receive a handbook with instructions on how to administer the grant. Technical assistance is also provided in a webinar which will be held on the date announced in the award letter. The handbook and webinar are intended for both Project Director and fellows.

Q16. Who is responsible for submitting the Human Subjects Clearance (IRB) narrative?

A16. The Project Director is responsible for collecting all IRB narratives from students who may need IRB approval for their research project. All student narratives must be combined into one document and uploaded in the ED Supplemental Form to the SF 424. The narrative questions that must be answered are found in the directions for the ED Supplemental Form to the SF 424

Q17. Whom should the Project Director contact in the event of technical problems with G5 e-application (e.g., problems accessing a form)?

A17. Technical difficulties and inquiries regarding the G5 e-Application system must be directed to the G5 e-Application Help Desk at 1-888-336-8930 (TTY: 1-866-697-2696, local 202-401-8363). Assistance is available Monday-Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Washington, DC time.

Q18. If the Project Director has a question specific to the DDRA program (e.g., eligibility requirements) whom should he/she contact?

A18. Inquiries about the DDRA Fellowship Program should be directed to the US/ED DDRA program officer at ddra@ed.gov.

Institutional DDRA Project Directors

Please check with the listed contact BEFORE completing your application as Project Directors may have changed.

List of Institutional DDRA Project Directors

Applicant Name

Director Name

Director E-mail

American University

Michael Keyes

[email protected]

Arizona State University

Heather Clark

[email protected]

Auburn University

George Crandell

[email protected]

Boston University

Emily Barman

[email protected]

Brown University

Thomas Lewis

[email protected]

California Institute of Integral Studies

Jody O’Connor

[email protected]

Carnegie Mellon University

Suzanne Laurich-McIntyre

[email protected]

Case Western Reserve University

Lynmarie Hamel

[email protected]

Catholic University

Andrew Abela

[email protected]

Clemson University

Kyle David Anderson

[email protected]

Columbia University

Sandra Peters

[email protected]

Cornell University

David Holmberg

Elizabeth Edmondson

eae56@ cornell.edu

[email protected]

The Research Foundation/CUNY for the Graduate Center/CUNY

Rachel Sponzo

[email protected]

Duke University

Giovanni Zanalda

Nancy Robbins

[email protected]

[email protected]

Emory University

Mike Suh

[email protected]

Florida Atlantic University

Robert Stackman

[email protected]

Florida A&M University

Donald Palm

[email protected]

Florida International University

Susan E. Webster

[email protected]

Florida State University

Adrienne Stephenson

[email protected]

George Mason University

Kathryn Agoston

[email protected]

Georgetown University

Maria Snyder

[email protected]

George Washington University

Eileen Lavelle

[email protected]

Georgia State University

Amanda Roshan-Rawaan

[email protected]

Harvard University

Noel Bisson

[email protected]

Howard University

Pamela Clarke

[email protected]

Indiana University

Melissa O’Neill

[email protected]

Johns Hopkins University

Chasmine Stoddart

[email protected]

Kent State University

Frank Congin

[email protected]

Louisiana State University

Harald Leder

[email protected]

Loyola University Chicago

Dale Tampke

[email protected]

Massachusetts Institute of

Technology

Kimberly Benard

[email protected]

Michigan State University

Joy Campbell

[email protected]

New York University

Allan Corns

[email protected]


Applicant Name

Director Name

Director E-mail


Abby Williams

[email protected]

North Carolina State University

Sherrie Sett